There are two main types of pricing in contracts: fixed and variable. With a fixed contract, the electric rate price you sign up for cannot change for the duration of your contract. With a variable contract, the rate price is subject to increase or decrease each day or month, based on the time of year and price of electricity for the provider at that moment. Variable pricing is often higher, but may be a good choice for those that don’t want to be locked into a contract.
1Offer valid for new residential customers in Texas only. Provisioned smart meter required. Free power begins on Fridays at 6:00 PM and ends Sunday at 11:59 PM. To utilize all features of the Echo Dot, you will need an 'always on' Wi-Fi internet service. If you cancel your plan early there's a fee of $135. You cannot return your Echo Dot to avoid the early cancellation fee. Terms and Conditions apply. All Amazon trademarks and copyrights are property of Amazon.com or its affiliates. The Echo Dot is provided by Direct Energy, Amazon is not a sponsor of this energy plan offer.
Variable Rate Plans: Designed as month-to-month contracts, these plans are in total control of your energy provider, which can shift the price you pay per kWh at its discretion. This means you, the consumer, are in a better place to reap the benefits when the energy market falls — but it also means you're at risk for hikes in prices, whether as a result of natural disasters or the provider's bottom line. Variable plans always offer a full year of price history to show the average price per kWh so you can get a sense of what you're getting into (like this one from Reliant) and know this: Variable plans don't have cancellation fees. You can cut your service at any time — a huge incentive for REPs to keep their prices reasonable.

Fixed-Rate Plans: These plans are steady and predictable; the price per kWh you sign up for will remain that same for the entirety of your contract. (The only changes in your bill will be from forces outside of your REP's control, like changes in TDU fees, or changes in federal, state, or local laws.) Often fixed-rate plans will have a slightly higher price per kWh than others, but you're paying for the predictability. They're great if you live by your budget – and even greater if you happen to sign up when rates are low. The fixed-rate plans of our five Texas providers typically started at 12 months, with some extending up to three years, but we spotted a couple from Reliant that offered fixed rates for six month contracts as well.
Since the State of Texas allowed us the power to choose the energy provider we want to use, we have seen an increase of electricity companies in Texas. But having so many electricity plans to choose from can also be confusing. With your desire to find the most reliable electricity company and the energy plan with the cheapest rate, choosing the right provider is not as easy as it seems. But fortunately you have us!
There are many different options for term lengths in the Texas energy market. Different term lengths often have different price points, so if you’re more flexible with the length of your contract, you could get a cheaper rate. Contracts with shorter term lengths are great if you prefer to avoid a long-term commitment while longer contracts usually provide the benefit of longer-term price stability.
5Green energy plans are supported 100% by Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) that are purchased and retired in an amount sufficient to match your annual consumption. RECs are a tradeable, non-tangible energy commodity in the United States that represents proof that 1 megawatt-hour (MWh) of electricity was generated from an eligible renewable energy resource like biomass, hydro, solar or wind. Please see your Terms of Service for more information.

With the power to choose a supply plan, shopping competitive Texas electric rates could potentially save you money on your monthly electricity bills. TexasElectricRates.com can help you compare retail energy companies in Texas, finding the supply plan that is right for you. Best of all, there isn’t any risk when you shop Texas electricity. Simple enter your ZIP code to start finding electric supply rates in your area.


According to a 2014 report[2] by the Texas Coalition for Affordable Power (TCAP), "deregulation cost Texans about $22 billion from 2002 to 2012. And residents in the deregulated market pay prices that are considerably higher than those who live in parts of the state that are still regulated. For example, TCAP found that the average consumer living in one of the areas that opted out of deregulation, such as Austin and San Antonio, paid $288 less in 2012 than consumers in the deregulated areas."
Another positive environmental impact is the effect of higher energy prices on consumer choices, similar to the US market trend toward more fuel-efficient cars. As electric bills have risen, residents are reducing their electrical usage by using more moderate thermostat settings, installing insulation, installing solar screens, and other such activities. Texas utilities (such as Austin Energy) are also installing advanced electricity meters that may one day enable variable pricing based on the time of day. This would permit energy customers to save money by further tailoring their consumption based on whether it occurred during the peak demand period (high cost/high pollution) or the off-peak (night time).

The ability to make an electric power switch gives Texas energy consumers the freedom to shop and search for a new rate. Texans switch power providers for a number of reasons. You may choose to switch power supply providers because you move to a new utility area that your current retail provider doesn't service. Maybe you switch power providers because you're unhappy with your current provider's level of customer service. Maybe your reason for switching is simply to find a better rate than what you have now. Whatever your reason may be, you have the power to switch electricity providers.
For example, shoppers for Texas electricity plans in the 77494 ZIP code in Katy, TX, could find 12-month plans for 6.8 cents/kWh in February; by June, electricity rates had increased 27 percent to 9.3 cents/kWh. As of early September, 12-month plans were up again, to 9.9 cents/kWh – a 6.5 percent hike from June and a 46 percent increase just since February.
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