The Public Utility Commission (PUC) has a website to help you find and compare all the electricity plans and providers in your area. Visit www.powertochoose.org or call 866-PWR-4-TEX (1-866-797-4839).  You can filter your options based on your usage, your preferred plan type, and several other factors. Once you’ve chosen the retail electricity provider that best suits your needs, you can sign up directly from their website.
Fixed rate electric plans lock you in to the same rate for the length of your contract. These contracts can last from 3 months – 5 years, but they typically last 6 months – 24 months. Regardless of how long you sign your contract for, you’ll pay the same amount per kilowatt-hour until the contract expires. It doesn’t matter if the price of electricity rises or falls during this time. This is why a fixed rate electric plan is best for those people who are looking for a long-term subscription. You’ll also want to have good credit, so you don’t have to pay a lot of money to get your electricity plan started.
Consider your electricity usage behavior and choose the best electricity rate accordingly. For a single adult that works a 9-5 job it makes sense to opt for an electricity company that offers a plan with free nights or has a low maximum usage restriction. In the other hand, a free weekends electricity plan or higher minimum usage restriction may be more appropriate for a family with kids.
The Public Utility Commission (PUC) has a website to help you find and compare all the electricity plans and providers in your area. Visit www.powertochoose.org or call 866-PWR-4-TEX (1-866-797-4839).  You can filter your options based on your usage, your preferred plan type, and several other factors. Once you’ve chosen the retail electricity provider that best suits your needs, you can sign up directly from their website.
One desired effect of the competition is lower electricity rates. In the first few years after the deregulation in 2002, the residential rate for electricity increased seven times, with the price to beat at around 15 cents per kilowatt hour (as of July 26, 2006, www.powertochoose.org) in 2006. However, while prices to customers increased 43% from 2002 to 2004, the costs of inputs rose faster, by 63%, showing that not all increases have been borne by consumers.[7] (See Competition and entry of new firms above for discussion on the relationship between retail prices, inputs, and investment.)

Utility companies are responsible for transmission and delivery of electricity even in energy deregulated parts of Texas and should be contacted in the event of a power outage. Your retail energy supplier may provide you competitive electric rates or exceptional customer service, but they cannot repair power lines or restore your service. In the case of an emergency, contact:
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