Compareelectricitytexas is regularly updated. As soon as the companies update their plan our site too is updated. So you always get the best rates and plans to choose from. We bring you the latest plans of electricity companies in Texas that are cheaper and offer more benefits. So now you can compare the most updated electricity rates and buy cheaper and get more benefits.
The price difference may be a few cents, but another Texas electricity company might offer better rewards, have better customer service, or may offer other plans you may be interested in the future. Some plans may draw you in with a low promotional rate, but once that promotional period is up you may be faced with a high rate. Be sure to read all the fine print when it comes to your electricity plan selection.
Despite the fact that Texas sees much higher temperatures year round, most households contain and use heating units. These units generate heat in one of four ways: other, propane, electricity and natural gas. Just over half of households in Texas use electricity to run their heating units. This is a much greater average than the overall average for the nation.

With a population of over 28 million and growing, Texas is one of the most highly inhabited states in the US. In order to power the homes and businesses within it, Texas produces more electricity than any other state, using roughly 400,000 million kilowatt-hours and enabling residents to consume billions of dollars worth of electricity. As of 2002, the Texas electricity market was deregulated, allowing residents to select their own electricity provider from one of the numerous service companies.  
One desired effect of the competition is lower electricity rates. In the first few years after the deregulation in 2002, the residential rate for electricity increased seven times, with the price to beat at around 15 cents per kilowatt hour (as of July 26, 2006, www.powertochoose.org) in 2006. However, while prices to customers increased 43% from 2002 to 2004, the costs of inputs rose faster, by 63%, showing that not all increases have been borne by consumers.[7] (See Competition and entry of new firms above for discussion on the relationship between retail prices, inputs, and investment.)

Electricity rates in Texas are not fixed. Your rate can vary greatly depending on your usage and your electric plan. Some plans have relatively flat rates, while others can be all over the place. This means that you could end up paying 7¢ for 999 kWhs and 8.5¢ for 1001 kWhs. That would be a 16% increase because you microwaved a few potatoes. Learn more on the different plan types here.
According to a typical economic theory, prices are optimally determined in a fair and transparent market, and not by a political or academic body. In deregulation of electricity markets, one immediate concern with pricing is that incumbent electricity providers would undercut the prices of new entrants, preventing competition and perpetuating the existing monopoly of providers. Thus, the SB7 bill introduced a phase-in period during which a price floor would be established (for incumbent electricity companies) to prevent this predatory practice, allowing new market entrants to become established. New market entrants could charge a price below the price to beat, but incumbents could not. This period was to last from 2002 to January 1, 2007. As of 2007 Texas investor owned utility affiliates no longer have price to beat tariffs.[6]
Energy Deregulation simply gives Texas residents the choice to select which electricity provider they want to use. In regulated cities, the state government restricts utility companies to only sell in their designated areas, taking the free market out of electricity. Texas deregulation gives the decision back to the consumer, and we’re happy to help make that decision easier.
Fixed-rate plans: Fixed-rate plans give customers more stability for their monthly energy bills because the rate a customer signs up with is the rate he or she pays for the length of the plan’s contract. Most fluctuation comes with usage, though transmission and delivery charges and local fees also can change.. Because a fixed-rate plan sometimes spans two-three years, these plans often require a customer credit check and can include early cancellation fees. Fixed-rate plans, because of the continuing market volatility, probably are the best choice for many consumers.
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