Free electricity is a phrase you’ll hear a lot about when you’re shopping for a new energy plan. Unfortunately, these plans only offer free electricity on weekends or at night, depending on what energy companies are advertising. This is because there really is no such thing as completely free electricity. In fact, you’ll pay more for your electricity during those hours that aren’t free. For this reason, these plans are best for families who aren’t home during the day and people who work traditional, 9 – 5 jobs.
Database of State Initiatives for Renewables & Efficiency (DSIRE) is a company and website that compiles a list of all the energy incentives available in the United States, by a particular state. The idea is to help inform the public about the latest and greatest energy programs and initiatives – all from one location. DSIRE receives funding from the United States Department of Energy and is run by the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center and N.C State University. Browsing the site programs gives you access to viewing all Texas related initiatives.
In environmental impact, results are mixed. With the ability to invest profits to satisfy further energy demand, producers like TXU are proposing eleven new coal-fired powerplants. Coal powerplants are cheaper than natural gas-fired powerplants, but produce more pollution. When the private equity firms Kohlberg Kravis Roberts and the Texas Pacific Group announced the take-over of TXU, the company which was known for charging the highest rates in the state and were losing customers, they called off plans for eight of the coal plants. TXU had invested more heavily in the other three. A few weeks later the buyers announced plans for two cleaner IGCC coal plants.
Energy Deregulation simply gives Texas residents the choice to select which electricity provider they want to use. In regulated cities, the state government restricts utility companies to only sell in their designated areas, taking the free market out of electricity. Texas deregulation gives the decision back to the consumer, and we’re happy to help make that decision easier.
CenterPoint Intelligent Energy Solutions LLC, IES, which manages TrueCost, is not the same legal entity as CenterPoint Energy Resources Corp. (CERC) or CenterPoint Energy Houston Electric, LLC (CEHE), nor is IES regulated by the Railroad Commission of Texas or the Public Utility Commission of Texas. You do not have to buy products or services from IES in order to continue to receive quality regulated services from CERC or CEHE.
Variable Rate Plans: Designed as month-to-month contracts, these plans are in total control of your energy provider, which can shift the price you pay per kWh at its discretion. This means you, the consumer, are in a better place to reap the benefits when the energy market falls — but it also means you're at risk for hikes in prices, whether as a result of natural disasters or the provider's bottom line. Variable plans always offer a full year of price history to show the average price per kWh so you can get a sense of what you're getting into (like this one from Reliant) and know this: Variable plans don't have cancellation fees. You can cut your service at any time — a huge incentive for REPs to keep their prices reasonable.
5Green energy plans are supported 100% by Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) that are purchased and retired in an amount sufficient to match your annual consumption. RECs are a tradeable, non-tangible energy commodity in the United States that represents proof that 1 megawatt-hour (MWh) of electricity was generated from an eligible renewable energy resource like biomass, hydro, solar or wind. Please see your Terms of Service for more information.
5Green energy plans are supported 100% by Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) that are purchased and retired in an amount sufficient to match your annual consumption. RECs are a tradeable, non-tangible energy commodity in the United States that represents proof that 1 megawatt-hour (MWh) of electricity was generated from an eligible renewable energy resource like biomass, hydro, solar or wind. Please see your Terms of Service for more information.
Once you narrowed down your choice for Texas electricity providers, research each company carefully. Visit review sites online to see what current and former customers have to say about a company. Many companies are also on social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter where you can easily interact with other customers and the company if you have any questions before signing up.
Since 2002, Amigo Energy has been one of the best electric companies in Texas. Not only that, but more recently we’ve received far fewer Public Utilities Commission of Texas (PUC) complaints than most other large residential electricity providers across the state.2 In fact, our customer service gets even better over the phone because our call-in customers have yet to file a PUC complaint this year.3 This ain’t our first rodeo—with over 15 years of experience and a track record of reliable service, you can trust Amigo Energy as your retail electricity provider.
There are two main types of pricing in contracts: fixed and variable. With a fixed contract, the electric rate price you sign up for cannot change for the duration of your contract. With a variable contract, the rate price is subject to increase or decrease each day or month, based on the time of year and price of electricity for the provider at that moment. Variable pricing is often higher, but may be a good choice for those that don’t want to be locked into a contract.

In Texas, the average household uses an average of 77 million Btu of electricity per year, which is approximately 14% less than the national average. Breaking these stats down even further shows us that electricity use in the average Texan home is 26% higher than the rest of the United States, however this isn’t much higher than several other states that are closest to Texas. When it comes to cost, the average total household bill per year is $1,801. This amount ranks amongst the highest across America, but other states that typically see soaring temperatures in the summer season aren’t far behind.

The average prices shown in these calculations represent average annual prices per kilowatt-hour (kWh). Some REPs charge rates that vary by season or usage level. As a result, the actual average price listed on a customer's bill for any given month may differ from that listed here, depending on the usage of the customer and the actual rates charged during that month. Please see the REP's Terms of Service document for the actual rates that will be charged by the REP.
According to the EIA, the overall average price of electricity for commercial customers in the US is 10.51 cents, while Texas business customers pay on average 8.23 cents per kWh (as of May 2018) for electricity. Is your business paying more? You may be able to save significantly, especially if your business is on a month-to-month or short term contract.
HOUSTON, Sept. 20, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Over the past summer, the Public Utilities Commission of Texas has been baffled by Retail Energy Providers using pricing gimmicks that dupe Texas consumers into high monthly bills at its Power to Choose website.(1) The PUC of Texas' best solution was to tweak some sort settings, limit the number of REP plans, and offer a "series of user-friendly PDFs and videos intended to guide and inform the customer."(2) The chairman has even recently said that if the PUCT can't figure out a solution, then the commission may just shut down the Power to Choose website.(3)
Compareelectricitytexas is regularly updated. As soon as the companies update their plan our site too is updated. So you always get the best rates and plans to choose from. We bring you the latest plans of electricity companies in Texas that are cheaper and offer more benefits. So now you can compare the most updated electricity rates and buy cheaper and get more benefits.

Residents and business owners have been able to shop Texas electricity supply rates for more than a decade. When Texans gained the ability to choose their desired energy company in 2002, the electric industry divided into two parts: supply and delivery. Retail energy companies in Texas compete for business, offering a variety of term agreements and supply rates for consumers to choose from.

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