With the power to choose a supply plan, shopping competitive Texas electric rates could potentially save you money on your monthly electricity bills. TexasElectricRates.com can help you compare retail energy companies in Texas, finding the supply plan that is right for you. Best of all, there isn’t any risk when you shop Texas electricity. Simple enter your ZIP code to start finding electric supply rates in your area.
Like we said, fees don’t necessarily make for a bad plan — although it’s worth it to do the math to see if you can save with another provider. For example, compare TXU Energy’s Simple Rate 12 plan with its $9.95 base charge, alongside Direct Energy’s Live Brighter 12 plan with a smaller base charge, and Reliant’s Digital Discount plan with no base charge. We’ll use a Corpus Christi ZIP code and assume 1,000 kWh/month of energy use.
Month-to-month electric plans are more commonly known as variable rate plans. With these plans the amount you pay per kilowatt-hour for your electricity each month will vary. This price is based on fluctuations in the market, so when the price of electricity falls you’ll pay less, but when it rises, you’ll pay more. In other words, you’re really gambling and should realize ahead of time that what you pay for your electric will change every month. This is why month-to-month electricity plans are only best for people who need electricity for a short amount of time.
Likewise, if you opt for a plan like our StarTex Power example, but in some months only hit 990 kWh of energy use, the $35 discount for cresting $1,000 kWh won't apply — and your bill is going to show it. Picking the right plan for you requires two things: an intimate knowledge of your home’s typical energy use, and a critical eye on any plan’s fine print.
Residents and business owners have been able to shop Texas electricity supply rates for more than a decade. When Texans gained the ability to choose their desired energy company in 2002, the electric industry divided into two parts: supply and delivery. Retail energy companies in Texas compete for business, offering a variety of term agreements and supply rates for consumers to choose from.
In a regulated electricity market you’re “forced” to buy your electricity from the local utility at a price that’s determined by your state and federal government. Typically, this is who you’ll pay your electric bill to, as well. However, if you live in Texas you live in a deregulated energy market. This means the state’s regulations are lifted. You can choose who provides your electricity and what price you pay for it.

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Database of State Initiatives for Renewables & Efficiency (DSIRE) is a company and website that compiles a list of all the energy incentives available in the United States, by a particular state. The idea is to help inform the public about the latest and greatest energy programs and initiatives – all from one location. DSIRE receives funding from the United States Department of Energy and is run by the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center and N.C State University. Browsing the site programs gives you access to viewing all Texas related initiatives.
You’ll never experience any interruptions when you switch electricity companies. In fact, service reliability is never affected at all. It typically requires 7 days for the new plan to go into effect and you won’t even notice when it happens. However, you want to make sure that you never make this switch before your current contract is up. Doing so could mean you’ll have to pay early termination fees or penalties.
There are two main types of pricing in contracts: fixed and variable. With a fixed contract, the electric rate price you sign up for cannot change for the duration of your contract. With a variable contract, the rate price is subject to increase or decrease each day or month, based on the time of year and price of electricity for the provider at that moment. Variable pricing is often higher, but may be a good choice for those that don’t want to be locked into a contract.
On average, Texas residents spend around $130 per month on electricity, higher than the national electricity average of $107. Depending on where you live and how much you use, Payless Power’s lower electric rates can help you to cut your monthly electricity bill and save hundreds on your power bill each year, with rates starting at 8 cents per kWh. If slashing your electric bill is your goal, Payless Power is the Texas electricity provider for you.
Database of State Initiatives for Renewables & Efficiency (DSIRE) is a company and website that compiles a list of all the energy incentives available in the United States, by a particular state. The idea is to help inform the public about the latest and greatest energy programs and initiatives – all from one location. DSIRE receives funding from the United States Department of Energy and is run by the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center and N.C State University. Browsing the site programs gives you access to viewing all Texas related initiatives.

Fixed rate electric plans lock you in to the same rate for the length of your contract. These contracts can last from 3 months – 5 years, but they typically last 6 months – 24 months. Regardless of how long you sign your contract for, you’ll pay the same amount per kilowatt-hour until the contract expires. It doesn’t matter if the price of electricity rises or falls during this time. This is why a fixed rate electric plan is best for those people who are looking for a long-term subscription. You’ll also want to have good credit, so you don’t have to pay a lot of money to get your electricity plan started.


Shopping for a plan based on renewable sources is no different than shopping for any other kind of plan — you calculate your costs the same way, look for the same fees, and weigh in customer satisfaction and other perks. The one thing that’s different is also looking at what percentage of your energy comes from renewable content in the EFL. That number can swing from as low as 0 percent all the way up to 100 percent, with the majority of plans that partially offset energy with renewable content hovering around 15 percent.
For example, if you use a small amount of energy each month, you expect to be rewarded — right? Unfortunately, nearly all electricity plans from Texas REPs are advertised as costing more per kWh the less electricity you use. It’s a little like buying in bulk: Providers often discount your bill when you cross certain kWh thresholds. For instance, one 12-month plan from StarTex Power quotes 8.1 cents per kWh for 1,000 kWh a month and 8.8 cents for 2,000 kWh per month, but 12.1 cents for 500 kWh per month. Why the difference? Customers get $35 back each month if they pass 1,000 kWh of use, and another $15 back per month if they cross 2,000 kWh. In this case, using half as much electricity as your neighbor on the same plan wouldn’t get you half the bill.
One desired effect of the competition is lower electricity rates. In the first few years after the deregulation in 2002, the residential rate for electricity increased seven times, with the price to beat at around 15 cents per kilowatt hour (as of July 26, 2006, www.powertochoose.org) in 2006. However, while prices to customers increased 43% from 2002 to 2004, the costs of inputs rose faster, by 63%, showing that not all increases have been borne by consumers.[7] (See Competition and entry of new firms above for discussion on the relationship between retail prices, inputs, and investment.)
Database of State Initiatives for Renewables & Efficiency (DSIRE) is a company and website that compiles a list of all the energy incentives available in the United States, by a particular state. The idea is to help inform the public about the latest and greatest energy programs and initiatives – all from one location. DSIRE receives funding from the United States Department of Energy and is run by the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center and N.C State University. Browsing the site programs gives you access to viewing all Texas related initiatives.
Intraday Data provided by SIX Financial Information and subject to terms of use. Historical and current end-of-day data provided by SIX Financial Information. All quotes are in local exchange time. Real-time last sale data for U.S. stock quotes reflect trades reported through Nasdaq only. Intraday data delayed at least 15 minutes or per exchange requirements.
While no company is perfect, we think an energy provider that owns up to mistakes and tries to treat customers fairly is a good thing for customers and for the deregulated energy industry. If a company isn't taking responsibility, we want the market competition to push them to be better, and customer reviews from energy consumers and ratepayers just like you makes that possible.
For example, shoppers for Texas electricity plans in the 77494 ZIP code in Katy, TX, could find 12-month plans for 6.8 cents/kWh in February; by June, electricity rates had increased 27 percent to 9.3 cents/kWh. As of early September, 12-month plans were up again, to 9.9 cents/kWh – a 6.5 percent hike from June and a 46 percent increase just since February.
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