Fixed-Rate Plans: These plans are steady and predictable; the price per kWh you sign up for will remain that same for the entirety of your contract. (The only changes in your bill will be from forces outside of your REP's control, like changes in TDU fees, or changes in federal, state, or local laws.) Often fixed-rate plans will have a slightly higher price per kWh than others, but you're paying for the predictability. They're great if you live by your budget – and even greater if you happen to sign up when rates are low. The fixed-rate plans of our five Texas providers typically started at 12 months, with some extending up to three years, but we spotted a couple from Reliant that offered fixed rates for six month contracts as well.
Gone are the days when you had to contact electric companies to discover their rates, and negotiate a better deal on your own. Today, Vault Electricity does the work for you, handling the entire process of finding the best Texas electricity rates and plans from providers that have a pedigree of business stability, customer service, eco-friendliness, and financial transparency. This allows you to shop for electricity in just a few minutes, right from your computer.
Minimum Usage Fees: Often set at or around 1,000 kWh/month, these fees mean you’ll always pay for at least that amount — even if you only use, say, 800 kWh of electricity some months. It sounds nasty, but it’s only something to be concerned about if your electricity bills historically show you hover right around that minimum use threshold. If you’re electricity use always exceeds that amount, it’s like it’s not even there.
There are many different options for term lengths in the Texas energy market. Different term lengths often have different price points, so if you’re more flexible with the length of your contract, you could get a cheaper rate. Contracts with shorter term lengths are great if you prefer to avoid a long-term commitment while longer contracts usually provide the benefit of longer-term price stability.

Like most Texas residents, as a business owner you can shop around and choose the right electricity plan for your business. Thank you deregulation! Choices include basic business energy plans (typically 12 – 60 months), tiered rate plans where the energy rate decreases each year, plans with a cheaper energy rate at night, and even plans that contribute to veteran organizations. The options are growing as electricity companies get more creative and tailor their plans to different industries.


Containing some of the most far-reaching landscapes and densely populated cities in the country, Texas is home to a variety of exciting attractions. Along with locations like the Alamo and NASA’s Johnson Space Center, the state also offers natural settings that include the Cascade Caverns and Big Bend National Park. With demand stemming from residents and tourists alike, providing power to the Lone Star State is an important duty to be entrusted only to a dependable electricity resource that can prioritize affordability.
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Due to the increased usage of natural gas immediately after deregulation, new-era energy tools such as wind power and smart-grid technology were greatly aided. Texas' first "renewable portfolio standard" — or requirement that the state's utilities get a certain amount of their power from renewable energy like wind — was signed into law in 1999, as part of the same legislation that deregulated the electric market.
The complaints filed against providers aren't a perfect mirror of the J.D. Power customer satisfactions scores. Just Energy, which earned only two J.D. Power Circles and earned the second-lowest score, had only 21 complaints recorded with the Public Utility Commission. But it's helpful to view these complaints in aggregate: Over 50 percent of the 1,119 total complaints fall under "billing" — another reason to seek out a provider with high customer satisfaction in that area in particular.

This information is compiled by the Public Utility Commission of Texas from publicly available information from the Retail Electric Providers and PUC approved price to beat rates (through December 2006) using representative usage levels. Rates are calculated using the Commission Approved Residential Load Profile for each service area. The PUC makes no recommendation with respect to any REP. Although we believe these prices are accurate, the PUC makes no warranty that the prices in this table are currently being offered. Please contact the relevant REP for their current pricing offers and terms of service. Information on how to select a REP and contact information for REPs is located at www.powertochoose.com.
While no company is perfect, we think an energy provider that owns up to mistakes and tries to treat customers fairly is a good thing for customers and for the deregulated energy industry. If a company isn't taking responsibility, we want the market competition to push them to be better, and customer reviews from energy consumers and ratepayers just like you makes that possible.
Texas Electricity Ratings is the destination website for Texas residents and business owners to share their opinions and have a voice in the Texas Deregulated Energy Market. We offer daily updated information about electricity rates in Houston, Dallas, Fort Worth, Arlington, and hundreds of other cities in Texas. Electricity Ratings, LLC helps people make informed buying decisions through its consumer reviews platform and is a reliable source for valuable consumer insight, advice, in-depth energy company service evaluations, and personalized recommendations. Since 2009, we've helped over 1.5 million shoppers find the best energy providers and rates. Electricity Ratings, LLC operates similar consumer energy shopping websites in Georgia, Ohio, Illinois, Connecticut, and New York.
No worries. It’s always a good idea to shop for a new electricity plan when you are moving to see if there is a better deal on electricity available. But, if you are happy with your current electric rate, most electricity providers will gladly keep you as a customer and continue service under your current contract at your new apartment or house as long as you move within the same utility delivery area. Don’t worry about early termination fees. If you are moving, your electricity provider cannot charge you an early termination fee if you provide a valid proof of a change of address thanks to customer protection rules established by the Public Utility Commission of Texas.

According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the average household in Texas uses about 15,000 kWh of electricity per year — 26 percent more than the national average, “but similar to the amount used in neighboring states.” That said, the only way to know your personal average energy consumption is by looking at your electricity bills over the course of a year (you want to accommodate all weather conditions) and understanding both your overall usage, as well as if you use more or less during certain months.
Twenty bucks compared to a $2,000 bill? Not much to write home about, but hey — it’s free money. And, true, you’ll still get some free money when you use less energy, but rewards only really seem reward-y if you're shelling out big bucks. That same Direct Energy plan only yields about $6 in Plenti points per year if you use 500 kWh of electricity each month.
There are two main types of pricing in contracts: fixed and variable. With a fixed contract, the electric rate price you sign up for cannot change for the duration of your contract. With a variable contract, the rate price is subject to increase or decrease each day or month, based on the time of year and price of electricity for the provider at that moment. Variable pricing is often higher, but may be a good choice for those that don’t want to be locked into a contract.
As a result, 85%[1] of Texas power consumers (those served by a company not owned by a municipality or a utility cooperative) can choose their electricity service from a variety of retail electric providers (REPs), including the incumbent utility. The incumbent utility in the area still owns and maintains the local power lines (and is the company to call in the event of a power outage) and is not subject to deregulation. Customers served by cooperatives or municipal utilities can choose an alternate REP only if the utility has "opted in" to deregulation; to date, only the area served by the Nueces Electric Cooperative has chosen to opt in.

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