†Offer is available to Texas residential customers who enroll using the Promotion Code “NIGHTSFREE”. Plan bills a monthly Base Charge, an Energy Charge, and passes through Utility Transmission and Distribution delivery charges. Energy Charges for usage consumed between 9pm and 7am each day is credited back on your bill. The utility charges, including delivery charges for night time hours, are passed through at cost and aggregated on your bill. See Electricity Facts Label for details.


On average, local residents pay $138 per month on energy, which stems from an average monthly use that amounts to 1,453 kWh. Compare this to national usage and billing, the citizens of the city consume more power than the average American, spending almost $20 more per month on power. The wide selection of electric companies and various rates play an important role when it comes to their bills, as they can range from less than $100 to over $200 per month with some of the lowest rates including $0.086 / kwh and $0.089 / kwh.
†Offer is available to Texas residential customers who enroll using the Promotion Code “NIGHTSFREE”. Plan bills a monthly Base Charge, an Energy Charge, and passes through Utility Transmission and Distribution delivery charges. Energy Charges for usage consumed between 9pm and 7am each day is credited back on your bill. The utility charges, including delivery charges for night time hours, are passed through at cost and aggregated on your bill. See Electricity Facts Label for details.
The city of Dallas is poised to reap huge benefits from a transformation in how energy is distributed. That’s because there’s a will and a way to get consumers savings on their electricity bills through the use of a competitive market. Texas is already ahead of the game on energy. It’s known for having plenty of oil, but it’s also got a rapidly growing renewable sector. Now, consumers can save on their monthly bills by switching to a retail electricity provider that offers lower rates.
Elisa has always delivered the information her clients need to make informed decisions. She has been published in industry journals, interviewed by The Wall Street Journal and on National Public Radio, and has spoken at numerous town hall meetings to encourage legislation for corporate accountability. She remains accessible and engaged with her clients, via electricity brokering services.

4. Know your current contract terms. Before you shop, know what you already have. (Surprisingly, most people don’t.) What’s your kwh rate? Check your electric bill. It may be higher than what’s available elsewhere. (In Texas, last week it ranged from 4.9 cents to as high as 13.5 cents.) Also call your provider and ask for the date your contract expires. Find out whether your rate is fixed or variable. Start planning a possible switch a month before a contract expires.
Unlike with long-term plans, monthly, variable rate (no-contract) plans have no cancellation fees. You won’t have to pay a penalty if you decide to take your business elsewhere because you found a better deal. Plus, you won’t be left paying more than you should if the market rate for energy trends down. However, if the market prices rise, you’ll have to pay more than those who are in-contract.
×