9. Check out your favorite. After you find a company with a rate and contract length you like, learn more about it. One way is to do an Internet search of the company. Place the company’s name in various searches beside these search terms: scam, rip-off and complaints. If the company has a troubled history, find out before you sign up. If only a few results come up from disgruntled customers, don’t worry. But if there are several dozen, continue with a quick search of the company’s Better Business Bureau record. And then, most important, return to powertochoose.org and below the name of the company, you’ll see “Complaint Scorecard” and “Complaint History.” Click on those links and learn more about the company.
By clicking above, you authorize SunLynk and up to four Solar Companies to call you and send you pre-recorded messages and text messages at the number you entered above, using an autodialer, with offers about their products or services, even if your phone number is on any national or state "Do Not Call" list. Message and data rates may apply. Your consent here is not based on a condition of purchase.
1. Legacy providers no longer rule. Get over the idea that original providers are the only companies that can offer solid, uninterrupted service. And don’t believe the fallacy that customers of legacy providers get serviced first when power goes out. Oncor Electric Delivery is responsible for maintaining the transmission system. Everybody uses Oncor to handle repairs in our region.
Knowing electricity rate price trend history is valuable information because the rate that you sign up for will be the rate you pay for the length of your contract.  If you moved into your home in the summer and you find yourself renewing your electricity plan every summer, you may be paying some of the highest rates offered for power all year long. It might be worth the expense to sign up for a short term plan as a stop gap measure until electricity rates are cheaper once demand isn’t as high.

2Security and Home Automation Services are offered by NRG Connected Home LLC d/b/a Reliant, TXB19469, 1201 Fannin Street, Houston Texas 77002. Electricity services are offered by Reliant Energy Retail Services, LLC d/b/a Reliant, PUCT Certificate #10007. Both are wholly owned by NRG Energy, Inc. Terms and conditions apply. For complete terms and conditions, visit reliant.com/connectterms. 

On average, local residents pay $138 per month on energy, which stems from an average monthly use that amounts to 1,453 kWh. Compare this to national usage and billing, the citizens of the city consume more power than the average American, spending almost $20 more per month on power. The wide selection of electric companies and various rates play an important role when it comes to their bills, as they can range from less than $100 to over $200 per month with some of the lowest rates including $0.086 / kwh and $0.089 / kwh.
Final switch tips. When you make your final selection, don’t call your current electricity provider to cancel. Sign up with the new company only. Try to sign up at least five to seven days before your plan expires so the overlap between the two billing cycles is negligible. Some people switch too late and pay higher prices during the transition. If you have a smart meter, the state rule is you must be switched within 48 hours. But five to seven days is safer.
GreenQuest does all the work! You’ll see how you compare with other similar users in your area, spot costly utility bill errors, get an accurate carbon footprint… even learn how much of an impact the weather has on your electric and fuel consumption. As GreenQuest brings your utility bill data to life, don’t be surprised if a few money and environment-saving ideas sprout up!
Dallas area residents now have the option for choosing their electric provider. However, with all of the different plans that are available, it can be difficult to make the right decision for your particular electricity needs. You may find yourself overwhelmed by the number of options presented to you by all the electric company advertisements or concerned about shady marketing gimmicks.
×