Understanding what you can expect to pay for each kWh of electricity you use is only the starting point of finding the best electricity rates in Dallas, Texas. You’ll also need to understand the terms they’re using, so that when you read through the contract you’ll actually know what they’re trying to convey about their electric rates. Some of the most commonly used terms energy providers use to tell you about their diverse energy plans, include:
Once you’ve signed up with your new energy supplier, you'll still communicate with your Dallas utility, or transmission/distribution service provider, on occasion. Oncor serves the Dallas area and responds to emergencies regarding damaged wires and power outages. Visit the Oncor website for outage updates, severe weather warnings and power interruptions in Dallas.

Check your current bill for the last few months to find out your average monthly usage and base your rate search on that usage level. For most Dallas residents, 1,500 kWh is about the average usage. The rates displayed by each provider are calculated based on a combination of energy rate and utility delivery charges. When you shop with ElectricityPlans.com, you can view the Plan Details and Pricing link next to each plan to determine how much you would pay for your electricity based on your actual usage for any given plan.
Final switch tips. When you make your final selection, don’t call your current electricity provider to cancel. Sign up with the new company only. Try to sign up at least five to seven days before your plan expires so the overlap between the two billing cycles is negligible. Some people switch too late and pay higher prices during the transition. If you have a smart meter, the state rule is you must be switched within 48 hours. But five to seven days is safer.
Unlike with long-term plans, monthly, variable rate (no-contract) plans have no cancellation fees. You won’t have to pay a penalty if you decide to take your business elsewhere because you found a better deal. Plus, you won’t be left paying more than you should if the market rate for energy trends down. However, if the market prices rise, you’ll have to pay more than those who are in-contract.
×