Living in the Dallas metroplex area and being served by Oncor as your local electric utility means that you have the power to choose from among dozens of competing electricity providers. All of them offer multiple rates, contract lengths and discount offers. In addition, each provider has its own website designed to lead you through the maze of complicated offers, which are often filled with confusing EFL details, overlooked fine print, and introductory rates. As a result, many customers are still confused by legal terms and narrow usage level bill credits frequently used on electricity plans for marketing purposes. As a result, they often end up getting surprised by unexpected fees and missing out on potential savings on their electric bills.

9. Check out your favorite. After you find a company with a rate and contract length you like, learn more about it. One way is to do an Internet search of the company. Place the company’s name in various searches beside these search terms: scam, rip-off and complaints. If the company has a troubled history, find out before you sign up. If only a few results come up from disgruntled customers, don’t worry. But if there are several dozen, continue with a quick search of the company’s Better Business Bureau record. And then, most important, return to powertochoose.org and below the name of the company, you’ll see “Complaint Scorecard” and “Complaint History.” Click on those links and learn more about the company.


Once you’ve signed up with your new energy supplier, you'll still communicate with your Dallas utility, or transmission/distribution service provider, on occasion. Oncor serves the Dallas area and responds to emergencies regarding damaged wires and power outages. Visit the Oncor website for outage updates, severe weather warnings and power interruptions in Dallas.
The city of Dallas is home to over 1.2 million residents, making it the third-most populated city in Texas. As a territory, it encompasses twenty zip codes and covers 385.8 square miles. Based on its proximity to Fort Worth, the two cities form Texas’ largest metroplex, which doubles as the fourth-most populated metropolitan area in the US. Not only does the metroplex have the largest metropolitan economy in the state, it lies within a deregulated market, allowing residents to choose the energy provider that they receive service from.
Unlike with long-term plans, monthly, variable rate (no-contract) plans have no cancellation fees. You won’t have to pay a penalty if you decide to take your business elsewhere because you found a better deal. Plus, you won’t be left paying more than you should if the market rate for energy trends down. However, if the market prices rise, you’ll have to pay more than those who are in-contract.
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