Half of 2017 has now passed, which means we should be able to highlight trends from the first half of the year and compare them with last year to project where energy rates might be for the remainder of 2017. These comparisons can help businesses better anticipate what the rates could look like for the remainder of the year and budget accordingly. Energy Trends At the moment, the 2017 average rates for electricity by state are only available for the months of January to April. That being said, there is still a lot of information we can gather about...
Last Thursday, the Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) held a live conference as part of their CSIS Energy and National Security Program. The presentation, hosted by CSIS Senior Vice President and Trustee Fellow, Frank Verrastro, called upon Ian Meed, Assistant Administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Office of Energy Analysis to present the United States Energy Administration’s (EIA) International Energy Outlook 2017. The presentation focused primarily on the long-term, international energy projections on a variety of topics including: Electricity generation by energy type Region defined primary energy sources Carbon dioxide emissions Fuel supplies Natural gas markets...
That means that customers in Houston paid an average of $5,500 more for electricity over a 14-year time span beginning in 2002, according to the group that buys electricity on behalf of municipal governments in Texas. The calculation, which uses data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration, assumes monthly electricity use of 1,300 kilowatt hours.
It’s recently come to our attention that there are some fairly substantial market changes that are impacting commercial customer electricity statements. These market changes have to do with something called the 4 Coincident Peak (4CP) program. If you participated in this program in 2016, then you might have already noticed that your utility has sent you new charges. The reason for this is because they have determined that your meter’s “demand element” has changed. But what do these changes really mean? What is the 4CP program and why are utilities suddenly applying new charges? And how can you benefit from...
Whether consumers are interested in a Fort Worth energy plan that features green energy, a price-protected supply rate or is from a leading Texas REP, shopping around can help narrow the supply plan search. Although Fort Worth community members can sign up with a REP, they'll still keep in contact with Oncor – the area's transmission and distribution service provider (TDSP).
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