Consumers in Houston, Dallas, Fort Worth and Corpus Christi were promised bargains on electricity when the Texas Legislature deregulated the electricity market. But 16 years later they're still paying more for electricity than their counterparts in cities Texas lawmakers exempted from deregulation such as Austin and San Antonio, according to the Texas Coalition for Affordable Power which analyzed federal electricity pricing data.
Even though customers in deregulated Texas markets routinely pay more for electricity, there is a bright spot. The gap between the average price paid for electricity between deregulated and regulated market has shrunk to 8.8 percent. In 2006, customers in deregulated cities were paying nearly 47 percent more for electricity than their counterparts in regulated cities.
Ready To Help Your Family, Friends & Neighbors? Please take a minute to leave a review for your current energy company. You will see the power of these electricity reviews when you are shopping for your new energy provider for your home. Please help someone out and write a review. You will be helping your fellow citizens to find the best electricity company that meets their requirements.
“  I've NEVER had a problem with StarTex. I've had several others and their rates and fees always increase. Startex doesn't have the lowest rate, but they are about in the middle. I always use the "AMI" promotional code when I renew and it gives me the cheapest possible price...typically about .2 cents off per kWh. I pay via my banks bill pay system and have never had an issue. They send me monthly bills, they send me renewal notices, and their customer service has always been prompt and courteous. I would highly recommend StarTex for a reliable, cost efficient, and good power company. ”
Last Thursday, the Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) held a live conference as part of their CSIS Energy and National Security Program. The presentation, hosted by CSIS Senior Vice President and Trustee Fellow, Frank Verrastro, called upon Ian Meed, Assistant Administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Office of Energy Analysis to present the United States Energy Administration’s (EIA) International Energy Outlook 2017. The presentation focused primarily on the long-term, international energy projections on a variety of topics including: Electricity generation by energy type Region defined primary energy sources Carbon dioxide emissions Fuel supplies Natural gas markets...

In Fort Worth, 0% of people have switched to a plan that has some renewable energy component to it. Another 0% have switched to a plan that is partially renewable, while 0% have switched to a plan that powers homes completely by renewable electricity. This of course means that 100% of people have remained on a plan powered by traditional sources of electricity such as coal or nuclear power.


About 14 years ago, Texas deregulation laws initiated competition for electric companies. In Fort Worth, people in the community can pick a retail electric provider (REP), but not all renters, business owners and homeowners in Texas have this option. If consumers own a business, live or rent in the city, they can decide amongst Fort Worth electric rates in their ZIP code.
×