That means that customers in Houston paid an average of $5,500 more for electricity over a 14-year time span beginning in 2002, according to the group that buys electricity on behalf of municipal governments in Texas. The calculation, which uses data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration, assumes monthly electricity use of 1,300 kilowatt hours.
In Fort Worth, 0% of people have switched to a plan that has some renewable energy component to it. Another 0% have switched to a plan that is partially renewable, while 0% have switched to a plan that powers homes completely by renewable electricity. This of course means that 100% of people have remained on a plan powered by traditional sources of electricity such as coal or nuclear power.
Electricity rates in Texas are not fixed. Your rate can vary greatly depending on your usage and your electric plan. Some plans have relatively flat rates, while others can be all over the place. This means that you could end up paying 7¢ for 999 kWhs and 8.5¢ for 1001 kWhs. That would be a 16% increase because you microwaved a few potatoes. Learn more on the different plan types here.
With close to 1 million residents, Fort Worth is a part of a fast-growing metropolitan area – including Arlington and Dallas – in North Central Texas. The city is made up of seven districts, all of which are deregulated. Aside from Fort Worth electricity supply options, the city has hidden gems when it comes to entertainment. Check out local spots such as craft breweries, music halls and authentic western apparel stores. The city is known as "Where the West Begins" for a reason!
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