In Fort Worth, 0% of people have switched to a plan that has some renewable energy component to it. Another 0% have switched to a plan that is partially renewable, while 0% have switched to a plan that powers homes completely by renewable electricity. This of course means that 100% of people have remained on a plan powered by traditional sources of electricity such as coal or nuclear power.
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But competition didn't necessarily end up cutting prices, according to the report. One contributing factor is confusion among customers as they try to choose among scores of retail electricity providers and the overwhelming variation of plans, leading many to just stick with familiar companies rather than look for better deals, according to the Texas Coalition for Affordable Power .
“  I have the generous saver plan that renews annually. I just renewed for my second year. We love this plan! saving so much I had to call in a couple times to make sure they were charging me correctly. I had never paid under $100 in the summer before in the middle of the heat waves in Texas. I recommend and no I do not work for them, just a regular customer. ”
Consumers in Houston, Dallas, Fort Worth and Corpus Christi were promised bargains on electricity when the Texas Legislature deregulated the electricity market. But 16 years later they're still paying more for electricity than their counterparts in cities Texas lawmakers exempted from deregulation such as Austin and San Antonio, according to the Texas Coalition for Affordable Power which analyzed federal electricity pricing data.
In Fort Worth, 0% of people have switched to a plan that has some renewable energy component to it. Another 0% have switched to a plan that is partially renewable, while 0% have switched to a plan that powers homes completely by renewable electricity. This of course means that 100% of people have remained on a plan powered by traditional sources of electricity such as coal or nuclear power.
The Big D is known for a bustling downtown, cutting-edge fashion, and beloved sports teams (including the Cowboys, once nicknamed America’s team). Although lesser-known worldwide, Dallas’ neighbor Fort Worth is just as powerful and will soon eclipse it’s older sister-city in size. Residents of this enormous metroplex demand the most current technology and quick service, and Quick Electricity strives to bring them the best of both.
It may come as a surprise that what you pay for power is a culmination of many factors. A lot goes into flipping on that switch: electricity must be generated and delivered through equipment that operates on fuel and requires building and maintenance costs. When the prices of these things increase or decrease, so does your electricity bill.  As a matter of fact, prices change every minute, but customers are charged based on seasonal demand. There are so many factors, some large, some small, that go into determining the price of electricity in the United States: Cost of Fuels: Electricity has to be generated and delivered, and these processes take energy supplied by fuels. As you probably know, fuel prices vary, which in turn affects the cost of electricity. Power Plant Costs: Like anything else, power plants need to be built and maintained. That, plus the operating costs, have an impact on electricity prices. Transmission and Distribution System Costs: Like the point above, distribution and delivery systems also need to be built, maintained, and repaired when necessary. Weather: Inclement weather can work for or against you when it comes to electricity costs. Rain and snow can assist in cheaper hydropower generation, while wind keeps turbines spinning. However, extreme weather that increases the demand for electricity can ultimately make it more expensive. Regulations: Regulations vary per state, with some service/utility...

So, you just found out — whether you read our blog post that broke the news or got a letter in the mail — that Breeze Energy is no longer in business in the state of Texas. For starters, you’re not alone.  There are almost 10,000 customers, homes, businesses, apartment complexes, etc., that are no longer able to get their electricity through Breeze Energy. What are my options?  Well, your immediate option is to do nothing.  This is a very bad option, however, as you’re currently at the Provider of Last Resort (POLR).  Simply put:  yes, your electricity is still on, but you’re paying a very high rate for it.  The good news is that there is no contract or agreement with a POLR and you’re free and very much encouraged to switch to an alternative retail energy provider as soon as possible. What are some good, reliable providers? We’ve partnered with dozens of REPs (Retail Electricity Providers) throughout numerous deregulated states.  As Texas is by far the biggest deregulated market — in addition to being where our headquarters is located — we have more rates, plans, and providers to choose from in Texas than in any other state. Enter in your zip code in the form above to view available rates and plans in your area.  We offer plans for both homes and businesses. “Green” Providers Similar to...


Located in Northern Texas, Fort Worth was founded in 1849. Based on population, the city is the fifth largest in Texas and boasts a population of almost nine-hundred thousand citizens. Originally founded as an army outpost, the city has transformed into one of the most prolific cities in the state. As part of the DFW metroplex, it contributes to the fourth largest metropolitan area in the United States. Due to the fact that Texas as a whole maintains a deregulated market, the city’s residents are able to select from a variety of energy service providers.
With stormy springs, hot summers, and mild winters, there are lots of things to plan for from season to season in Fort Worth. Make your electricity bill the least of your worries and lock your rates prior to the hot summer months to help you save money on your bills. When you lock in your rate, you can rest easy knowing that you don't have to be concerned about fluctuating energy prices during these warmer months. We offer fixed rate plans for as short as 3 months to as long as 36 months!
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