Texas deregulated most of the state's electricity markets in 2002, a move aimed at lowering electricity costs by letting consumers choose their own electric power providers and their own plans. Some parts of Texas continued to be regulated, including those that get power from municipal utilities, electric cooperatives and investor-owned utilities that operate outside the state's primary power grid.
Since the deregulation of energy began impacting Dallas/Fort Worth in 2002, the residents of the DFW metroplex have been given their choice of electricity provider. The power to choose prepaid electricity in Dallas and Fort Worth has brought about a new way to buy electricity by means of a smart meter. Smart meters read electricity usage in real-time, allowing electric companies to connect a customer and read their daily usage in minutes. This in turn saves the company money and allows them to pass the savings on to you, the customer.
It may come as a surprise that what you pay for power is a culmination of many factors. A lot goes into flipping on that switch: electricity must be generated and delivered through equipment that operates on fuel and requires building and maintenance costs. When the prices of these things increase or decrease, so does your electricity bill.  As a matter of fact, prices change every minute, but customers are charged based on seasonal demand. There are so many factors, some large, some small, that go into determining the price of electricity in the United States: Cost of Fuels: Electricity has to be generated and delivered, and these processes take energy supplied by fuels. As you probably know, fuel prices vary, which in turn affects the cost of electricity. Power Plant Costs: Like anything else, power plants need to be built and maintained. That, plus the operating costs, have an impact on electricity prices. Transmission and Distribution System Costs: Like the point above, distribution and delivery systems also need to be built, maintained, and repaired when necessary. Weather: Inclement weather can work for or against you when it comes to electricity costs. Rain and snow can assist in cheaper hydropower generation, while wind keeps turbines spinning. However, extreme weather that increases the demand for electricity can ultimately make it more expensive. Regulations: Regulations vary per state, with some service/utility...
Companies across many industries use sales, promotions, and incentives to advertise and attract new customers — electric companies in deregulated states are no different. Many homes and businesses across the United States benefit from having the option to choose an electricity provider.  Of course, after the initial 3-month, 6 month, 12-month plan, etc. contract has expired with one provider, a home or business can switch to another provider offering services in that area. Since switching electricity companies is fairly easy, most providers offer different types of incentives to try and attract a competitor’s customers. But first things first. Before we get...
Since areas surrounding downtown – such as Sycamore and Northside – are mostly populated by families, homeowners might want to consider plans that will last for several years. Rather than switching REPs every few months, you can choose to stick with your preferred retailer for a longer period of time by opting for a long-term contract. Also, if you're looking to grow a relationship with your REP, you can research retailers based on their attention to customer care.
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