BREAKING NEWS (May 30, 2018) Breeze Energy is leaving the Texas market effective immediately, ElectricChoice.com has just learned. Breeze Energy is a retail electric provider (REP) providing 100% wind energy to thousands of customers in Texas. They’re estimated to have over 9,000 customers and accounts including residential, commercial, and multi-family units. Lead by John Spicer (President), Breeze Energy was incorporated in the state of Texas on December 12, 2000.  They have been registered with the Better Business Bureau since 2013 and currently have an A+ rating.  We’ve reached out to Mr. Spicer for comment and will update this post...
Last Thursday, the Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) held a live conference as part of their CSIS Energy and National Security Program. The presentation, hosted by CSIS Senior Vice President and Trustee Fellow, Frank Verrastro, called upon Ian Meed, Assistant Administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Office of Energy Analysis to present the United States Energy Administration’s (EIA) International Energy Outlook 2017. The presentation focused primarily on the long-term, international energy projections on a variety of topics including: Electricity generation by energy type Region defined primary energy sources Carbon dioxide emissions Fuel supplies Natural gas markets...

At ElectricityPlans.com you can shop and compare “Free Electricity at Certain Times” from the most reputable electricity providers in the state. There are one-year and two-year term versions of these time of use electricity plans. ElectricityPlans.com outlines all of the necessary plan details for each free time plan so that the consumer can make an informed decision about which plan best fits their needs.


Switching to a different electricity supplier in Texas is kind of like picking a different phone company. When you switch to Spark Energy, the utility will continue to deliver your electricity, and they will remain your point of contact in case of an emergency. We’ll bill you monthly for the utility’s delivery services and for your electricity usage.
It may come as a surprise that what you pay for power is a culmination of many factors. A lot goes into flipping on that switch: electricity must be generated and delivered through equipment that operates on fuel and requires building and maintenance costs. When the prices of these things increase or decrease, so does your electricity bill.  As a matter of fact, prices change every minute, but customers are charged based on seasonal demand. There are so many factors, some large, some small, that go into determining the price of electricity in the United States: Cost of Fuels: Electricity has to be generated and delivered, and these processes take energy supplied by fuels. As you probably know, fuel prices vary, which in turn affects the cost of electricity. Power Plant Costs: Like anything else, power plants need to be built and maintained. That, plus the operating costs, have an impact on electricity prices. Transmission and Distribution System Costs: Like the point above, distribution and delivery systems also need to be built, maintained, and repaired when necessary. Weather: Inclement weather can work for or against you when it comes to electricity costs. Rain and snow can assist in cheaper hydropower generation, while wind keeps turbines spinning. However, extreme weather that increases the demand for electricity can ultimately make it more expensive. Regulations: Regulations vary per state, with some service/utility...
Following a warning from the FBI last month that Russian hackers were attacking the US power grid, Energy Services Group (ESG) has been knocked offline for the second time in recent months. As of this writing, ESG’s systems remain offline to scores of brokers, suppliers, and utilities in Texas that rely on them every single day.  ESG has yet to release many details in regards to the continued outage, but it has stated that it will be down until “further notice.” ESG not only strongly supports and impacts Texas’ energy operations, but dozens of other states, provinces, and prefectures,...
About 14 years ago, Texas deregulation laws initiated competition for electric companies. In Fort Worth, people in the community can pick a retail electric provider (REP), but not all renters, business owners and homeowners in Texas have this option. If consumers own a business, live or rent in the city, they can decide amongst Fort Worth electric rates in their ZIP code.
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