If you’re a Duke Energy customer, your piggy bank might see a little more coin this summer. According to recent press release, customers of Duke Energy are likely in for a treat this summer! Experts say that based on several different factors, the electric power company’s customer’s bills will be 3% – 4% lower compared to 2016’s summer months. President of Duke Energy Ohio and Kentucky had the following to say about the good news: “We experienced warmer-than-normal weather last summer. As a result, our customers used more electricity to cool their homes. This summer, we’re forecasting temperatures that are closer to normal. That means our...
Based on some new information from the EIA, and other government news outlets, it look like solar and wind generated power is starting to take over the renewable energy landscape.  In fact, the EIA estimates that wind has already surpassed hydroelectricity generation. By 2035, both wind and solar will surpass hydroelectricity generation altogether. Taking a deeper look into why this shift will occur will help us to better understand how important renewable resources will become throughout the United States. Analyzing renewable resources like solar and wind, and how they will help to generate more reliable electricity, will also help us to better...
Since areas surrounding downtown – such as Sycamore and Northside – are mostly populated by families, homeowners might want to consider plans that will last for several years. Rather than switching REPs every few months, you can choose to stick with your preferred retailer for a longer period of time by opting for a long-term contract. Also, if you're looking to grow a relationship with your REP, you can research retailers based on their attention to customer care.
“Electricity websites are confusing, especially in the DFW area. I appreciate that Quick [Electricity] is a “no gimmick” electric provider. I got a cheap rate and I continue to get notifications of any changes the company is going through unlike other prepaid lights companies in Fort Worth. I really do payLESS for power with Quick [Electricity]. Thanks from Ft Worth.”
That means that customers in Houston paid an average of $5,500 more for electricity over a 14-year time span beginning in 2002, according to the group that buys electricity on behalf of municipal governments in Texas. The calculation, which uses data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration, assumes monthly electricity use of 1,300 kilowatt hours.
Whether consumers are interested in a Fort Worth energy plan that features green energy, a price-protected supply rate or is from a leading Texas REP, shopping around can help narrow the supply plan search. Although Fort Worth community members can sign up with a REP, they'll still keep in contact with Oncor – the area's transmission and distribution service provider (TDSP).
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