BREAKING NEWS (May 30, 2018) Breeze Energy is leaving the Texas market effective immediately, ElectricChoice.com has just learned. Breeze Energy is a retail electric provider (REP) providing 100% wind energy to thousands of customers in Texas. They’re estimated to have over 9,000 customers and accounts including residential, commercial, and multi-family units. Lead by John Spicer (President), Breeze Energy was incorporated in the state of Texas on December 12, 2000.  They have been registered with the Better Business Bureau since 2013 and currently have an A+ rating.  We’ve reached out to Mr. Spicer for comment and will update this post...
Thank you for visiting Electricity Scout. It is our desire to show you a full and extensive list of Electricity Companies as well as a detailed review of each and every one. As experts, we work to tweak our official algorithm to these electricity companies to help you locate the number 1 power company. Please take a minute and discover our entire ranking here:
Bounce Energy loves the Internet, especially when it comes to social media. We look at social networks as exciting ways to interact with our customers, share information, and address any concerns you might have. On our social media outlets, you'll find energy efficiency tips, seasonal recipes, energy saving suggestions, green living recommendations, and a host of other fun stuff.
But competition didn't necessarily end up cutting prices, according to the report. One contributing factor is confusion among customers as they try to choose among scores of retail electricity providers and the overwhelming variation of plans, leading many to just stick with familiar companies rather than look for better deals, according to the Texas Coalition for Affordable Power .
If you’ve read the news in recent weeks, it’s become extremely clear that hurricane season is upon the United States. While hurricane season itself isn’t unusual, the fact that so many of these storms are making landfall in places like Texas and Florida is. The problem with hurricanes making landfall is that they can cause incredible damage in a short period of time. With winds between 74 (category 1) to 154 (category 5) mph, and an average rainfall of 5 – 15 inches, power lines can break, poles can topple over, and the power in your home can go out —...

Thank you for visiting Electricity Scout. It is our desire to show you a full and extensive list of Electricity Companies as well as a detailed review of each and every one. As experts, we work to tweak our official algorithm to these electricity companies to help you locate the number 1 power company. Please take a minute and discover our entire ranking here:

Last Thursday, the Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) held a live conference as part of their CSIS Energy and National Security Program. The presentation, hosted by CSIS Senior Vice President and Trustee Fellow, Frank Verrastro, called upon Ian Meed, Assistant Administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Office of Energy Analysis to present the United States Energy Administration’s (EIA) International Energy Outlook 2017. The presentation focused primarily on the long-term, international energy projections on a variety of topics including: Electricity generation by energy type Region defined primary energy sources Carbon dioxide emissions Fuel supplies Natural gas markets...
While energy deregulation aims to help people afford the electricity they use, the fact that it opens the electricity market up to competition can sometimes encourage the wrong kinds of people. Energy deregulation allows organizations known as electricity providers (and their affiliates) to offer supply related energy services to energy consumers.  The vast majority of these organizations and the people working for them are legit and offer many different types of products and services that are reasonable, fair, and are advertised with honesty and transparency. However, there are individuals out there who try to take advantage of consumers. They run...
Texas deregulated most of the state's electricity markets in 2002, a move aimed at lowering electricity costs by letting consumers choose their own electric power providers and their own plans. Some parts of Texas continued to be regulated, including those that get power from municipal utilities, electric cooperatives and investor-owned utilities that operate outside the state's primary power grid.
Some locations closer to Fort Worth's downtown such as Northeast have a larger renter population. Renters might shop a little differently than other homeowners, depending on their situation. If you're in a shorter rental agreement, you can shop for shorter Fort Worth electricity supply plans. Keep in mind that new Fort Worth electric rates on supply can pop up at any time.
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