Even though customers in deregulated Texas markets routinely pay more for electricity, there is a bright spot. The gap between the average price paid for electricity between deregulated and regulated market has shrunk to 8.8 percent. In 2006, customers in deregulated cities were paying nearly 47 percent more for electricity than their counterparts in regulated cities.
BREAKING NEWS (May 30, 2018) Breeze Energy is leaving the Texas market effective immediately, ElectricChoice.com has just learned. Breeze Energy is a retail electric provider (REP) providing 100% wind energy to thousands of customers in Texas. They’re estimated to have over 9,000 customers and accounts including residential, commercial, and multi-family units. Lead by John Spicer (President), Breeze Energy was incorporated in the state of Texas on December 12, 2000.  They have been registered with the Better Business Bureau since 2013 and currently have an A+ rating.  We’ve reached out to Mr. Spicer for comment and will update this post...
Last Thursday, the Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) held a live conference as part of their CSIS Energy and National Security Program. The presentation, hosted by CSIS Senior Vice President and Trustee Fellow, Frank Verrastro, called upon Ian Meed, Assistant Administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Office of Energy Analysis to present the United States Energy Administration’s (EIA) International Energy Outlook 2017. The presentation focused primarily on the long-term, international energy projections on a variety of topics including: Electricity generation by energy type Region defined primary energy sources Carbon dioxide emissions Fuel supplies Natural gas markets...
Companies across many industries use sales, promotions, and incentives to advertise and attract new customers — electric companies in deregulated states are no different. Many homes and businesses across the United States benefit from having the option to choose an electricity provider.  Of course, after the initial 3-month, 6 month, 12-month plan, etc. contract has expired with one provider, a home or business can switch to another provider offering services in that area. Since switching electricity companies is fairly easy, most providers offer different types of incentives to try and attract a competitor’s customers. But first things first. Before we get...
If you’ve read the news in recent weeks, it’s become extremely clear that hurricane season is upon the United States. While hurricane season itself isn’t unusual, the fact that so many of these storms are making landfall in places like Texas and Florida is. The problem with hurricanes making landfall is that they can cause incredible damage in a short period of time. With winds between 74 (category 1) to 154 (category 5) mph, and an average rainfall of 5 – 15 inches, power lines can break, poles can topple over, and the power in your home can go out —...
Some locations closer to Fort Worth's downtown such as Northeast have a larger renter population. Renters might shop a little differently than other homeowners, depending on their situation. If you're in a shorter rental agreement, you can shop for shorter Fort Worth electricity supply plans. Keep in mind that new Fort Worth electric rates on supply can pop up at any time.
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