Are You Ready To Help Your Family, Friends & Neighbors? Please take a minute to leave feedback about your current energy provider. You will uncover the power of these electricity reviews when you shop for your new energy provider for your home. Please return the favour and leave a review. You will be assisting your fellow Texans to locate the best energy provider that meets their requirements.
Based in Houston, TX, Direct Energy operates as a residential energy retailer in 11 U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. As a wholly owned subsidiary of Centrica, plc, Direct Energy is now the largest residential energy supplier in North America. Various packages and plans are available to residential customers in Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Texas and Massachusetts.

The threat of price spikes have been long in the making, the result of changing economics of power production. The shale drilling boom produced record amounts of natural gas, which pushed prices to all-time lows and made gas-fired plants cheaper to operate than coal. Renewable energy such as wind is also producing abundant amounts of electricity at a lower cost than coal.
Another unwelcome side effect of not knowing your average monthly kWh usage level is that you may end up paying more than you expect. This can occur when a customer inadvertently shops an electric rate based on a higher usage level than they actually use. Electricity suppliers commonly advertise their electric rates associated with the highest (2000 kWh) usage levels since those tend to be the lowest rates.
One of the best electricity providers is Payless Power, a company that is based in Texas and serves residents across the state. They do not require deposits or credit cards and also don’t have long term-contracts, so everyone is approved. They let you setup text or email alerts so that you can keep an eye on your energy usage as well. You have options to pay online and in person, as Payless Power accepts cash payments at Moneygram locations all around the country(not just in Texas).

Explore Houston electric rates below. If the ZIP code listed at the top is not yours, be sure to change it for the most accurate listings and supply rates. Electricity plans in Houston can be filtered in many different ways. If you're looking for a particular attribute, such as a low rate or a certain provider, be sure to use the sorting features. You can also click Company Info for more details on each provider.
TXU is high because they charge their customers for the "fuel" to run their power plants - that's what the supervisor told us when we called to complain about my godmother's bill. Her actual usuage was $350 and they charged her an additional $350. And she didn't understand the bill so she had been paying it for months until we started looking at it. They are a rip off. Would never recommend them.
How does that work? Spark Energy buys electricity and competes in the market for the best price -- a competition that ultimately drives prices down and allows us to deliver more value for your money. In Texas, switching to a different electricity provider is kind of like changing to a different long distance company. When you switch to Spark Energy, the utility will continue to deliver electricity to your home but Spark Energy will handle all the billing, including the utility’s delivery fees and the electricity you actually use.
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After spending so much time and energy with energy companies, I figure I should pass this info onto the internet world (within Houston). I am a Centerpoint Energy resident (you don't get to choose the electricity provider you have; it's based on where the electricity is provided). I think Houston is predominantly a Centerpoint energy area (correct me if I'm wrong).

Using an average of 1,063 kWh of power each month, Houston’s electricity consumption rates exceed the national average by over 100 kWh. As a city however, it does manage to maintain a lower monthly energy charge than the rest of the US, incurring an average fee of $99 in comparison to the $112 national monthly average. To further save on their plans each month, residents can choose from a selection of Texas-based energy suppliers and service plans.


Texas has one of the most thriving electricity markets in the country, and Houston is reaping the benefits. In a state that has plenty of oil, as well as a rapidly growing renewable sector, electricity providers are flocking to its largest city in search of customers. This is good news for residents of the city of Houston. Companies are competing for electricity contracts, and are willing to offer customers great deals to get business.

Not only does Amigo Energy feature useful resources on our blog, but we have the right technology to help you track your residential electricity usage and take actions that may help with energy savings. We offer the latest technology (phone apps, smart thermostats, and even smart sprinklers) so you can worry less about your electric bill and focus on what really matters in life.


I was unwillingly and unknowingly signed up by a Green Mountain energy Sales Advisor who approached me at a career event.I was approached by a guy who asked if he could just talk to me about what Green Mountain has to offer, even though I told him no. Although I am currently in a contract with my provider, and very satisfied with my current service, I decided to give this guy the benefit of the doubt and listen to his sales pitch (I'm in sales as well and was interested to see how effective he was)He informed me about some of the rates they offered and how they are "environmentally conscious" blah blah blah. He then asked if he could have my email address in order to send me rates, along with a 10-day promotional period where IF I decided I wanted to make the switch, I would be able to do so by clicking the link in the email. He guaranteed that they would handle everything with my current provider and make the switch a smooth transition. I reiterated the fact that I was not interested in switching, and that the contract I have in place is in my roommates name anyways. He said "No problem! This is NOT a promise of service. This is simply an option for you if you DO decide to switch.". Well, after reading all of these wonderful Yelp reviews on Green Mountain (sarcasm), I decided hell no, I'm staying with my current provider. 10 days later, I have an email from Green Mountain stating that I was now a customer. I immediately called them and told them I never gave consent to be a Green Mountain customer. Keep in mind, THIS GUY ONLY HAD MY NAME AND EMAIL ADDRESS. I could literally sign my dog up for Green Mountain, that's how easy it was for them to do it for me. Anyways, now I'm in a mess trying to get my other service turned back on, which they're charging $410 for a reactivation fee along with the early termination fee from this scam artist. Bottom line - do not speak with any sales associates from this company and if you do, don't give them ANY information.
Prices on longer term plans of a year or more have also risen significantly. Retail electricity providers are reluctant to discuss their prices — especially rising ones — but the Association of Electric Companies of Texas, a trade group, estimated that the rate on a one-year fixed price offer on the Power to Choose website has climbed more than 20 percent over the past year to an average of 11.1 cents per kilowatt hour.
I had service with Startex at my home and at a rental property. I requested the power be turned off at the rental home. I had an online transcript of the call to document the request. Instead, they turned it off at my home. I lost all the food in the refrigerator and the freezer. The power at the rental was still on. I called them about the issue. They stated it was not their issue. They told me that the utility company must have turned it off. I called the utility provider and the confirmed they had a move our request from Startex. Startex is not ethical and does not take responsibility for their errors. Choose another provider.
Consumers in Houston, Dallas, Fort Worth and Corpus Christi were promised bargains on electricity when the Texas Legislature deregulated the electricity market. But 16 years later they're still paying more for electricity than their counterparts in cities Texas lawmakers exempted from deregulation such as Austin and San Antonio, according to the Texas Coalition for Affordable Power which analyzed federal electricity pricing data.

The local electric company is the utility – that’s the company who owns the infrastructure, including the poles and power lines that deliver electricity to your home. They are who you call if your power goes out or there's an emergency. But in almost every city in Texas, you must choose another company to supply that energy, called a Retail Electric Provider (REP). These REPs, like Spark Energy, allow you to choose electricity plans that offer competitive prices and plans to meet your needs.
CenterPoint Energy, a company that offers natural gas in six states and electricity to all of Houston, services the city and greater area. There are various choices for energy providers in Houston, and Choose Energy has partnered with some of the best. Customers have selections among trusted providers such as Reliant Energy, Direct Energy and TriEagle Energy.
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