You can sort, filter, and shop by pricing at YOUR specific usage level, which lets you shop and compare electricity plans based on the rates you’ll actually experience on your bill, inclusive of hidden fees and taxes. This ensures you’re not misled by the cheaper rates often advertised by electric providers…those “teaser rates” associated with higher usage levels that many households never enjoy because their usage level never reaches that pricing tier.

There are approximately 5,000 businesses associated with the energy industry in Houston, which is why the city is known as the world's "Energy Capital." Houston is home to more than 2 million people and is one of the most populated areas in the United States. City homeowners, renters and business owners get to choose between energy companies in Houston to supply their electricity. In Houston, one electricity supply rate won't fit the needs of all energy users. Therefore, it's important for consumers to use electric choice to shop for the best plan for them.
CenterPoint Intelligent Energy Solutions LLC, IES, which manages TrueCost, is not the same legal entity as CenterPoint Energy Resources Corp. (CERC) or CenterPoint Energy Houston Electric, LLC (CEHE), nor is IES regulated by the Railroad Commission of Texas or the Public Utility Commission of Texas. You do not have to buy products or services from IES in order to continue to receive quality regulated services from CERC or CEHE.
The average prices shown in these calculations represent average annual prices per kilowatt-hour (kWh). Some REPs charge rates that vary by season or usage level. As a result, the actual average price listed on a customer's bill for any given month may differ from that listed here, depending on the usage of the customer and the actual rates charged during that month. Please see the REP's Terms of Service document for the actual rates that will be charged by the REP.

Whether you live in a large city or small town, we can save you money! Where do we provide Texas electricity? We service customers in more than 400 deregulated communities in Texas. We work with principal utilities throughout the state of Texas to provide prepaid electricity. The utilities are: Oncor in the Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex and various parts of West Texas; CenterPoint Energy in Houston and the surrounding areas; AEP Central in Corpus Christi and surrounding areas; AEP North in Abilene and other North Texas communities.
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The average prices shown in these calculations represent average annual prices per kilowatt-hour (kWh). Some REPs charge rates that vary by season or usage level. As a result, the actual average price listed on a customer's bill for any given month may differ from that listed here, depending on the usage of the customer and the actual rates charged during that month. Please see the REP's Terms of Service document for the actual rates that will be charged by the REP.
Electric companies buy longer-term contracts so they can hedge their risks when they’re selling long-term electricity plans. Just a week ago, it looked as if wholesale prices would be as high as Texas has seen in the past 15 years, said Ned Ross, director of governmental affairs for Direct Energy, the third biggest seller of electricity in Texas, behind No. 1 NRG and No. 2 TXU. Future prices have retreated recently, but companies buying power for August are still paying at least double what they paid a year ago, according to data from the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, or ERCOT, which oversees the state’s power markets.
Consumers in Houston, Dallas, Fort Worth and Corpus Christi were promised bargains on electricity when the Texas Legislature deregulated the electricity market. But 16 years later they're still paying more for electricity than their counterparts in cities Texas lawmakers exempted from deregulation such as Austin and San Antonio, according to the Texas Coalition for Affordable Power which analyzed federal electricity pricing data.

Using an average of 1,063 kWh of power each month, Houston’s electricity consumption rates exceed the national average by over 100 kWh. As a city however, it does manage to maintain a lower monthly energy charge than the rest of the US, incurring an average fee of $99 in comparison to the $112 national monthly average. To further save on their plans each month, residents can choose from a selection of Texas-based energy suppliers and service plans.


First Choice Power has been certified as a retail electricity provider in Texas since 2001. Offering many types of plans, First Choice Power also makes a point of supporting the communities it is a part of. Across Texas, First Choice Power invests in hunger relief programs and offers grants to local organizations making a difference in their communities.
There are approximately 5,000 businesses associated with the energy industry in Houston, which is why the city is known as the world's "Energy Capital." Houston is home to more than 2 million people and is one of the most populated areas in the United States. City homeowners, renters and business owners get to choose between energy companies in Houston to supply their electricity. In Houston, one electricity supply rate won't fit the needs of all energy users. Therefore, it's important for consumers to use electric choice to shop for the best plan for them.
Electric bills for customers in the Houston area can more than double in summer months, mainly because air conditioning. Not coincidentally, electric rates also rise in the summer months because of this increase in demand. The most dramatic rate increases occur in month-to-month plans, but electric rates do increase across the board for all fixed-rate contract lengths.
2. Most companies have this basic $9.95/mo charge if you don't meet a certain kWh, usually 1000 kWh (Reliant is 800kWh minimum). That will pose a problem in those more temperate months like in the spring and fall because although you're paying lower kWh,you're paying that extra $9.95/mo for no reason. ASK YOUR ENERGY PROVIDER WHAT THE LIMIT IS. I got a minimum of 800kWh/mo with Reliant; if I go under 800kWh, I will have to pay $9.95. Good thing about Reliant is that they do a weekly energy usage report, and you can keep up with how much you may owe. That's pretty useful to me, considering I live in a smaller space, thus less usage.
You can sort, filter, and shop by pricing at YOUR specific usage level, which lets you shop and compare electricity plans based on the rates you’ll actually experience on your bill, inclusive of hidden fees and taxes. This ensures you’re not misled by the cheaper rates often advertised by electric providers…those “teaser rates” associated with higher usage levels that many households never enjoy because their usage level never reaches that pricing tier.
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