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In addition to having a healthy dose of Texas pride, we also pride ourselves on providing friendly customer service. Amigo Energy customer service comes in a variety of convenient ways—from our mobile app and desktop portal, to our US-based call center with over 500 customer service agents. No matter which type of Amigo Energy customer support you choose, you’re sure to get the service you need in the timeframe you want it.
Payless Power provides the best prepaid and standard energy plans with no cancelation fees and no deposit in the area. Since 2005, Payless Power has been helping people get better energy rates and save money on their average power bill, regardless of income or credit history. As a family-owned energy provider and not one of the giant electricity suppliers, we take great pride in serving our customers with care and respect.
As a residential or commercial customer, you’ll enjoy competitive rates, flexible contracts, and personalized plans that give you the power to choose what’s best for you. And we offer no-deposit electricity for well-qualified customers and deposit payment plans for those with less than desirable credit so that switching retail electric providers won’t break the bank.‡ When you switch to Amigo Energy today, you’ll switch on the power of convenience and affordability.
CenterPoint Intelligent Energy Solutions LLC, IES, which manages TrueCost, is not the same legal entity as CenterPoint Energy Resources Corp. (CERC) or CenterPoint Energy Houston Electric, LLC (CEHE), nor is IES regulated by the Railroad Commission of Texas or the Public Utility Commission of Texas. You do not have to buy products or services from IES in order to continue to receive quality regulated services from CERC or CEHE.
By clicking above, you authorize SunLynk and up to four Solar Companies to call you and send you pre-recorded messages and text messages at the number you entered above, using an autodialer, with offers about their products or services, even if your phone number is on any national or state "Do Not Call" list. Message and data rates may apply. Your consent here is not based on a condition of purchase.

This information is compiled by the Public Utility Commission of Texas from publicly available information from the Retail Electric Providers and PUC approved price to beat rates (through December 2006) using representative usage levels. Rates are calculated using the Commission Approved Residential Load Profile for each service area. The PUC makes no recommendation with respect to any REP. Although we believe these prices are accurate, the PUC makes no warranty that the prices in this table are currently being offered. Please contact the relevant REP for their current pricing offers and terms of service. Information on how to select a REP and contact information for REPs is located at www.powertochoose.com.
Should you choose a short-term, long-term, month-to-month, or prepaid plan? The short answer: it depends on your specific needs. How long do you anticipate living at your location? Are you deciding in the peak season (summer in Houston) or off season? All electricity providers in Houston offer a broad selection of plans for different contract lengths. Many also offer month-to-month and prepaid electricity plans. The bottom line is that everyone’s needs are different and all contract term lengths offer advantages and disadvantages.
For commercial customers, understanding a few basic details of your electricity consumption can make a big difference in the prices offered by retail providers. We are able to provide a proposal based on estimated and historical usage for your business that will organize the best offers the market has to offer. Residential rates are organized and continuously updated to ensure you are getting the best price from the strongest suppliers .

2. Most companies have this basic $9.95/mo charge if you don't meet a certain kWh, usually 1000 kWh (Reliant is 800kWh minimum). That will pose a problem in those more temperate months like in the spring and fall because although you're paying lower kWh,you're paying that extra $9.95/mo for no reason. ASK YOUR ENERGY PROVIDER WHAT THE LIMIT IS. I got a minimum of 800kWh/mo with Reliant; if I go under 800kWh, I will have to pay $9.95. Good thing about Reliant is that they do a weekly energy usage report, and you can keep up with how much you may owe. That's pretty useful to me, considering I live in a smaller space, thus less usage.

By clicking above, you authorize SunLynk and up to four Solar Companies to call you and send you pre-recorded messages and text messages at the number you entered above, using an autodialer, with offers about their products or services, even if your phone number is on any national or state "Do Not Call" list. Message and data rates may apply. Your consent here is not based on a condition of purchase.


Even though customers in deregulated Texas markets routinely pay more for electricity, there is a bright spot. The gap between the average price paid for electricity between deregulated and regulated market has shrunk to 8.8 percent. In 2006, customers in deregulated cities were paying nearly 47 percent more for electricity than their counterparts in regulated cities.

Patrick Mays, an engineer for an oil and gas company in Houston, recently went shopping for a new electricity plan and found that the best deal available would cost about 55 percent more than what he’s paying, boosting his average rate to 9.5 cents per kilowatt hour from 6.1 cents under his expiring 12-month contract. The power bills for his 2,000-square foot home will climb an average of $30 a month over the year, he said, but he will take the brunt of the rate increase during the hot summer when he estimates his monthly bill will top out at $186, nearly double the $95 he paid last year.

Patrick Mays, an engineer for an oil and gas company in Houston, recently went shopping for a new electricity plan and found that the best deal available would cost about 55 percent more than what he’s paying, boosting his average rate to 9.5 cents per kilowatt hour from 6.1 cents under his expiring 12-month contract. The power bills for his 2,000-square foot home will climb an average of $30 a month over the year, he said, but he will take the brunt of the rate increase during the hot summer when he estimates his monthly bill will top out at $186, nearly double the $95 he paid last year.
Ready to shop? Below you’ll find available electricity rates in Houston. Search for plans by rate, term length or brand. If you have an apartment with a short lease, a supply plan with a shorter length might be the best for you. However, if you own a home and don’t plan on moving for a while, you can look for long-term plans. You have the power to choose!
The average prices shown in these calculations represent average annual prices per kilowatt-hour (kWh). Some REPs charge rates that vary by season or usage level. As a result, the actual average price listed on a customer's bill for any given month may differ from that listed here, depending on the usage of the customer and the actual rates charged during that month. Please see the REP's Terms of Service document for the actual rates that will be charged by the REP.
When you enroll in Wise Buy Conserve 12 Plus, our 12-month fixed price plan, not only will you get the same great price for a full year, but also the convenience of automatic payments and paperless billing. Usage Credit: $25 per billing cycle when usage is greater than 999 kWh and less than 2001 kWh. For new customers. Cancellation Fee: $200. PUCT# 10177
Electric bills for customers in the Houston area can more than double in summer months, mainly because air conditioning. Not coincidentally, electric rates also rise in the summer months because of this increase in demand. The most dramatic rate increases occur in month-to-month plans, but electric rates do increase across the board for all fixed-rate contract lengths.
That means that customers in Houston paid an average of $5,500 more for electricity over a 14-year time span beginning in 2002, according to the group that buys electricity on behalf of municipal governments in Texas. The calculation, which uses data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration, assumes monthly electricity use of 1,300 kilowatt hours.
To skirt the late summer electricity rate hikes, a little bit of planning can really pay off. Try to avoid signing new long-term electricity contracts in late summer. While it may be impossible to escape signing a new electricity contract if you’re moving during that time, just know that a short-term plan may make more sense until the rates go back down in the fall.  That way you’re not stuck paying a premium rate for an entire year or more.
Ready to shop? Below you’ll find available electricity rates in Houston. Search for plans by rate, term length or brand. If you have an apartment with a short lease, a supply plan with a shorter length might be the best for you. However, if you own a home and don’t plan on moving for a while, you can look for long-term plans. You have the power to choose!
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