Since 2002, Amigo Energy has been one of the best electric companies in Texas. Not only that, but more recently we’ve received far fewer Public Utilities Commission of Texas (PUC) complaints than most other large residential electricity providers across the state.2 In fact, our customer service gets even better over the phone because our call-in customers have yet to file a PUC complaint this year.3 This ain’t our first rodeo—with over 15 years of experience and a track record of reliable service, you can trust Amigo Energy as your retail electricity provider.


At ElectricityPlans, we’re here to do one thing – help you find the best electricity plan to fit your needs. We are big advocates of electricity competition and your power to choose your own electricity provider. We offer completely unbiased electricity plans and display accurate, transparent pricing to take the guesswork out of choosing your electricity plan.
With over 2.3 million residents, Houston is the largest city in Texas and the fourth most populated in the United States. Encompassing over six hundred square miles, Houston stands as the fifth most popular metropolitan area in the country and gets its name from the commander who won Texas’ independence from Mexico in 1836. The city lies in the southeastern portion of the state within a deregulated Electricity market and as such, allows residents to select an energy provider from the various service companies that serve the state.
Are you a small business owner or wanting to move your small business to Houston? Shopping business energy rates with electricity scout is very stress free and convenient. To get the least expensive business energy quote, all you have to do is visit our Commercial Energy Services page and fill out our Quote Request form. This will instantly notify the top electricity companies servicing small Business in Houston to generate a quote specifically for your business.

Ready to shop? Below you’ll find available electricity rates in Houston. Search for plans by rate, term length or brand. If you have an apartment with a short lease, a supply plan with a shorter length might be the best for you. However, if you own a home and don’t plan on moving for a while, you can look for long-term plans. You have the power to choose!
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Many states require contractors to carry some form of insurance along with their license. Insist that whomever you hire has the proper amount of insurance for the work you need done and call the insurer to check the policy. See that whom you hire for the job has liability and workers' compensation insurance so you don't pay for injuries or accidents caused by the company's work.
When picking power service for Houston, TX the best section to begin is from the Texas ranking page. It was constructed by Texans, for Texans. There shoppers will find a detailed list of the best energy companies in the State of Texas. Once you have found an energy provider that exceeds your requirements, you can then sort based on rates for Houston.

Since 2002, Amigo Energy has been one of the best electric companies in Texas. Not only that, but more recently we’ve received far fewer Public Utilities Commission of Texas (PUC) complaints than most other large residential electricity providers across the state.2 In fact, our customer service gets even better over the phone because our call-in customers have yet to file a PUC complaint this year.3 This ain’t our first rodeo—with over 15 years of experience and a track record of reliable service, you can trust Amigo Energy as your retail electricity provider.

REPs sell electricity rates to Houston energy consumers, but transmission and distribution service providers (TDSPs) deliver the supply of electricity. In Houston, CenterPoint Energy serves as the area's TDSP and works with about 85 REPs. If your power goes out, immediately report the issue to CenterPoint Energy, not your REP. Use the following phone numbers to get in touch with your Houston TDSP.

Are You Ready To Help Your Family, Friends & Neighbors? Please take a minute to leave feedback about your current energy provider. You will uncover the power of these electricity reviews when you shop for your new energy provider for your home. Please return the favour and leave a review. You will be assisting your fellow Texans to locate the best energy provider that meets their requirements.
When you’re shopping for great Texas electricity providers, you want to be smart about it. Your choices go beyond Texas electricity rates. Bounce not only offers great deals, but you can sign up for rewards programs, refer your friends, track your usage by appliance, and more. Need more convincing? Bounce Energy gives back to the community and has great customer service by phone, Facebook, and Twitter. It was founded in Texas and serves Texans…and it’s just the cool Texas brand.
2. Most companies have this basic $9.95/mo charge if you don't meet a certain kWh, usually 1000 kWh (Reliant is 800kWh minimum). That will pose a problem in those more temperate months like in the spring and fall because although you're paying lower kWh,you're paying that extra $9.95/mo for no reason. ASK YOUR ENERGY PROVIDER WHAT THE LIMIT IS. I got a minimum of 800kWh/mo with Reliant; if I go under 800kWh, I will have to pay $9.95. Good thing about Reliant is that they do a weekly energy usage report, and you can keep up with how much you may owe. That's pretty useful to me, considering I live in a smaller space, thus less usage.

The average prices shown in these calculations represent average annual prices per kilowatt-hour (kWh). Some REPs charge rates that vary by season or usage level. As a result, the actual average price listed on a customer's bill for any given month may differ from that listed here, depending on the usage of the customer and the actual rates charged during that month. Please see the REP's Terms of Service document for the actual rates that will be charged by the REP.
Consumers in Houston, Dallas, Fort Worth and Corpus Christi were promised bargains on electricity when the Texas Legislature deregulated the electricity market. But 16 years later they're still paying more for electricity than their counterparts in cities Texas lawmakers exempted from deregulation such as Austin and San Antonio, according to the Texas Coalition for Affordable Power which analyzed federal electricity pricing data.
Champion Energy’s growth is driven by competitive, straightforward pricing and a reputation for maintaining the highest levels of satisfaction with its customers. In fact, Champion Energy has ranked “Highest in Residential Customer Satisfaction with Retail Electric Service in Texas” by J. D. Power for 5 out of the last 6 years. Choose Champion Energy and get straightforward pricing, 24/7 customer care and Smart Track weekly usage reports.
That means that customers in Houston paid an average of $5,500 more for electricity over a 14-year time span beginning in 2002, according to the group that buys electricity on behalf of municipal governments in Texas. The calculation, which uses data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration, assumes monthly electricity use of 1,300 kilowatt hours.
In summary, fixed-rate plans provide a level of certainty and stability in your energy charge since the price will not fluctuate over the life of your contract. If prices suddenly spike, you are protected because your rate is locked in. The flip side is that if rates drop over the life of your contract, you’ll be stuck paying the higher rate. You can incur steep cancellation fees if you change electricity plans or providers before the end of your contract term.

For commercial customers, understanding a few basic details of your electricity consumption can make a big difference in the prices offered by retail providers. We are able to provide a proposal based on estimated and historical usage for your business that will organize the best offers the market has to offer. Residential rates are organized and continuously updated to ensure you are getting the best price from the strongest suppliers .
Patrick Mays, an engineer for an oil and gas company in Houston, recently went shopping for a new electricity plan and found that the best deal available would cost about 55 percent more than what he’s paying, boosting his average rate to 9.5 cents per kilowatt hour from 6.1 cents under his expiring 12-month contract. The power bills for his 2,000-square foot home will climb an average of $30 a month over the year, he said, but he will take the brunt of the rate increase during the hot summer when he estimates his monthly bill will top out at $186, nearly double the $95 he paid last year.
As a result, power companies have shut down Texas coal plants unable to compete with lower-cost generators. Meanwhile, the low electricity prices of recent years — a function of cheap natural gas — and small profits have discouraged companies from investing in new power plants. ERCOT, which oversees about 90 percent of the state’s power grid, said power reserves that are called on when demand peaks on the hottest summer days have shrunk to the lowest levels since Texas deregulated power markets in 2002.
The Bayou City is diverse in its population, culture and electricity rates. Houston attracts college students who attend well-known schools in the area such as Texas Southern University, University of Houston and Rice University. Also, Houston's entertainment and year-round events appeal to young couples and families. Attend an Astros game in Minute Maid Park or visit the Houston Zoo – there's always something happening in H-town.
I was unwillingly and unknowingly signed up by a Green Mountain energy Sales Advisor who approached me at a career event.I was approached by a guy who asked if he could just talk to me about what Green Mountain has to offer, even though I told him no. Although I am currently in a contract with my provider, and very satisfied with my current service, I decided to give this guy the benefit of the doubt and listen to his sales pitch (I'm in sales as well and was interested to see how effective he was)He informed me about some of the rates they offered and how they are "environmentally conscious" blah blah blah. He then asked if he could have my email address in order to send me rates, along with a 10-day promotional period where IF I decided I wanted to make the switch, I would be able to do so by clicking the link in the email. He guaranteed that they would handle everything with my current provider and make the switch a smooth transition. I reiterated the fact that I was not interested in switching, and that the contract I have in place is in my roommates name anyways. He said "No problem! This is NOT a promise of service. This is simply an option for you if you DO decide to switch.". Well, after reading all of these wonderful Yelp reviews on Green Mountain (sarcasm), I decided hell no, I'm staying with my current provider. 10 days later, I have an email from Green Mountain stating that I was now a customer. I immediately called them and told them I never gave consent to be a Green Mountain customer. Keep in mind, THIS GUY ONLY HAD MY NAME AND EMAIL ADDRESS. I could literally sign my dog up for Green Mountain, that's how easy it was for them to do it for me. Anyways, now I'm in a mess trying to get my other service turned back on, which they're charging $410 for a reactivation fee along with the early termination fee from this scam artist. Bottom line - do not speak with any sales associates from this company and if you do, don't give them ANY information.
Comparing electricity plans in Houston means more than just looking at plans to find the lowest rate. Be sure to take a look at each plan's Product Details to get a better idea of what each one entails. These fact sheets are more than just supply rates per kWh and term lengths; they include information on base charges, utility fees and cancellation fees. They also can include features such as usage credits, green energy products or even free weekends.
Texas deregulation began in early 2002 with the approval of Texas Senate Bill Number 7. Now, the majority of the state, including Houston, has the power to select their own provider. Previously, consumers were only given one option for an energy supplier. Deregulation has allowed competition in the energy market and has given residents the power to choose which energy provider sells them energy and bills them each month.
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