On the other hand, month-to-month variable rate (no-contract) plans don’t have cancellation fees. You won’t be penalized if you find a better deal elsewhere and want to make another switch.  And, you won’t be stuck paying more than you should be if the market rate for electricity trends down.  But, if it goes up, you’ll be paying more than your in-contract neighbors, and you’ll likely want to shop around again for a better deal.
Whether you live in a large city or small town, we can save you money! Where do we provide Texas electricity? We service customers in more than 400 deregulated communities in Texas. We work with principal utilities throughout the state of Texas to provide prepaid electricity. The utilities are: Oncor in the Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex and various parts of West Texas; CenterPoint Energy in Houston and the surrounding areas; AEP Central in Corpus Christi and surrounding areas; AEP North in Abilene and other North Texas communities.

The increase in retail rates come as companies prepare for surging prices in the wholesale electricity markets where they buy their power. Forecasts of higher than normal temperatures and record power demand are coinciding with the shutdown of at least three coal-fired plants, leading to concerns that temporary shortages on the hottest summer days could send wholesale prices, which typically average less than $50 per megawatt hour, spiking to $3,000 per megawatt hour or higher. (A megawatt hour is 1,000 kilowatt hours.)
Champion Energy’s growth is driven by competitive, straightforward pricing and a reputation for maintaining the highest levels of satisfaction with its customers. In fact, Champion Energy has ranked “Highest in Residential Customer Satisfaction with Retail Electric Service in Texas” by J. D. Power for 5 out of the last 6 years. Choose Champion Energy and get straightforward pricing, 24/7 customer care and Smart Track weekly usage reports.
TXU is high because they charge their customers for the "fuel" to run their power plants - that's what the supervisor told us when we called to complain about my godmother's bill. Her actual usuage was $350 and they charged her an additional $350. And she didn't understand the bill so she had been paying it for months until we started looking at it. They are a rip off. Would never recommend them.
This information is compiled by the Public Utility Commission of Texas from publicly available information from the Retail Electric Providers and PUC approved price to beat rates (through December 2006) using representative usage levels. Rates are calculated using the Commission Approved Residential Load Profile for each service area. The PUC makes no recommendation with respect to any REP. Although we believe these prices are accurate, the PUC makes no warranty that the prices in this table are currently being offered. Please contact the relevant REP for their current pricing offers and terms of service. Information on how to select a REP and contact information for REPs is located at www.powertochoose.com.

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Using an average of 1,063 kWh of power each month, Houston’s electricity consumption rates exceed the national average by over 100 kWh. As a city however, it does manage to maintain a lower monthly energy charge than the rest of the US, incurring an average fee of $99 in comparison to the $112 national monthly average. To further save on their plans each month, residents can choose from a selection of Texas-based energy suppliers and service plans.
I was unwillingly and unknowingly signed up by a Green Mountain energy Sales Advisor who approached me at a career event.I was approached by a guy who asked if he could just talk to me about what Green Mountain has to offer, even though I told him no. Although I am currently in a contract with my provider, and very satisfied with my current service, I decided to give this guy the benefit of the doubt and listen to his sales pitch (I'm in sales as well and was interested to see how effective he was)He informed me about some of the rates they offered and how they are "environmentally conscious" blah blah blah. He then asked if he could have my email address in order to send me rates, along with a 10-day promotional period where IF I decided I wanted to make the switch, I would be able to do so by clicking the link in the email. He guaranteed that they would handle everything with my current provider and make the switch a smooth transition. I reiterated the fact that I was not interested in switching, and that the contract I have in place is in my roommates name anyways. He said "No problem! This is NOT a promise of service. This is simply an option for you if you DO decide to switch.". Well, after reading all of these wonderful Yelp reviews on Green Mountain (sarcasm), I decided hell no, I'm staying with my current provider. 10 days later, I have an email from Green Mountain stating that I was now a customer. I immediately called them and told them I never gave consent to be a Green Mountain customer. Keep in mind, THIS GUY ONLY HAD MY NAME AND EMAIL ADDRESS. I could literally sign my dog up for Green Mountain, that's how easy it was for them to do it for me. Anyways, now I'm in a mess trying to get my other service turned back on, which they're charging $410 for a reactivation fee along with the early termination fee from this scam artist. Bottom line - do not speak with any sales associates from this company and if you do, don't give them ANY information.
To skirt the late summer electricity rate hikes, a little bit of planning can really pay off. Try to avoid signing new long-term electricity contracts in late summer. While it may be impossible to escape signing a new electricity contract if you’re moving during that time, just know that a short-term plan may make more sense until the rates go back down in the fall.  That way you’re not stuck paying a premium rate for an entire year or more.
At ElectricityPlans, we’re here to do one thing – help you find the best electricity plan to fit your needs. We are big advocates of electricity competition and your power to choose your own electricity provider. We offer completely unbiased electricity plans and display accurate, transparent pricing to take the guesswork out of choosing your electricity plan.
*Offer valid for new residential customers in Texas only. Provisioned smart meter required. Free power begins on Fridays at 6:00 PM and ends Sunday at 11:59 PM. To utilize all features of the Echo Dot, you will need an 'always on' Wi-Fi internet service. If you cancel your plan early there's a fee of $135. You cannot return your Echo Dot to avoid the early cancellation fee. Terms and Conditions apply. All Amazon trademarks and copyrights are property of Amazon.com or its affiliates. The Echo Dot is provided by Direct Energy, Amazon is not a sponsor of this energy plan offer.

Prices are expected to go up so quickly that Direct Energy has stopped selling its "Power-to-Go" plan to new customers this summer, a prepaid plan that changes rates each month depending on wholesale prices. Instead, the company is encouraging its customers to lock in for longer periods of time. Customers who used up to 2,000 kilowatts each month could get a 12-month contract for 11.7 cents per kilowatt hour in May compared to the same plan for 9.1 cents per kilowatt hour one year earlier.
Based in Houston, TX, Direct Energy operates as a residential energy retailer in 11 U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. As a wholly owned subsidiary of Centrica, plc, Direct Energy is now the largest residential energy supplier in North America. Various packages and plans are available to residential customers in Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Texas and Massachusetts.

1. After your contract ends, the energy company will send you a notification of your rate increasing to a variable rate (which usually translates to 2-3 cents higher/kWh by a certain date). They are supposed to notify you of this change. I've noticed as a customer, we get short-changed of one month from the contract rate (if you signed for 7 cents for 6 months, you'll only get that for 5 months). If you don't call, your rate goes up significantly if you don't call to change to a cheaper contract. Tell them you want the cheapest rate or you will cancel with their company.
After spending so much time and energy with energy companies, I figure I should pass this info onto the internet world (within Houston). I am a Centerpoint Energy resident (you don't get to choose the electricity provider you have; it's based on where the electricity is provided). I think Houston is predominantly a Centerpoint energy area (correct me if I'm wrong).
Prepaid electricity plans are yet another option available to Texas customers. Prepaid plans let you avoid credit checks and deposits by pre-paying for your electricity. Prepaid electricity plans typically do not have a fixed duration and operate on a pay-as-you-go basis. Shopping for prepaid electricity can often yield relatively cheap electricity with no deposit. See Prepaid Electricity: Is It Right For Me? for more.
Texas deregulation began in early 2002 with the approval of Texas Senate Bill Number 7. Now, the majority of the state, including Houston, has the power to select their own provider. Previously, consumers were only given one option for an energy supplier. Deregulation has allowed competition in the energy market and has given residents the power to choose which energy provider sells them energy and bills them each month.
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