You’re popular. Use that to your advantage. When you sign up with Bounce Energy, you get a unique referral code when you login to your MyAccount. Share your code over email, put it on Facebook, take out a billboard. For every person who signs up with your code, you’ll get a $50 bill credit. No limits. And your buddies who sign up get a $50 bill credit, too. Being friendly saves!
The city of Houston has a long and rich history. Named after General Sam Houston, it is the largest city in the state of Texas and the fourth largest city in the United States. Home to 26 fortune 500 companies, affordable housing, world-class museums and cultural landmarks, it’s no wonder that the city is ranked one of the best places to live in the state of Texas.
With over 2.3 million residents, Houston is the largest city in Texas and the fourth most populated in the United States. Encompassing over six hundred square miles, Houston stands as the fifth most popular metropolitan area in the country and gets its name from the commander who won Texas’ independence from Mexico in 1836. The city lies in the southeastern portion of the state within a deregulated Electricity market and as such, allows residents to select an energy provider from the various service companies that serve the state.

Comparing electricity plans in Houston means more than just looking at plans to find the lowest rate. Be sure to take a look at each plan's Product Details to get a better idea of what each one entails. These fact sheets are more than just supply rates per kWh and term lengths; they include information on base charges, utility fees and cancellation fees. They also can include features such as usage credits, green energy products or even free weekends.


If you’re looking for cheap electricity in Houston, TX, you’ve come to the right place. We compiled the best electricity plans in Houston from the top providers, ensuring that each electricity company we select meets our high standards for business stability, eco-friendliness, and transparent pricing. You can rest easy knowing you’re choosing the best from the best.


Houston is becoming much greener, and all signs indicate that the city will continue to be a leader in the renewable energy sector. Green energy in Houston is widely available for consumers. Choose Energy has partnered with Amigo Energy and Green Mountain Energy, two trusted green energy suppliers in Houston. The city's energy efficiency rank typically falls within the top ten, and no other municipality buys more renewable energy. Recently, Causes.com rated the city the 10th greenest in the nation.


Electricity Source:  Green power generally refers to the production of electricity using renewable sources like wind and solar. Once the technology is installed, there’s very little cost–environmental or financial–to producing more power. The resulting (green) electricity is low on guilt and high in market value. With the abundance of sunlight and wind power that Texas gets, green electric suppliers are widely popular.
The Bayou City is diverse in its population, culture and electricity rates. Houston attracts college students who attend well-known schools in the area such as Texas Southern University, University of Houston and Rice University. Also, Houston's entertainment and year-round events appeal to young couples and families. Attend an Astros game in Minute Maid Park or visit the Houston Zoo – there's always something happening in H-town.
Electric bills for customers in the Houston area can more than double in summer months, mainly because air conditioning. Not coincidentally, electric rates also rise in the summer months because of this increase in demand. The most dramatic rate increases occur in month-to-month plans, but electric rates do increase across the board for all fixed-rate contract lengths.

As a residential or commercial customer, you’ll enjoy competitive rates, flexible contracts, and personalized plans that give you the power to choose what’s best for you. And we offer no-deposit electricity for well-qualified customers and deposit payment plans for those with less than desirable credit so that switching retail electric providers won’t break the bank.‡ When you switch to Amigo Energy today, you’ll switch on the power of convenience and affordability.


1. After your contract ends, the energy company will send you a notification of your rate increasing to a variable rate (which usually translates to 2-3 cents higher/kWh by a certain date). They are supposed to notify you of this change. I've noticed as a customer, we get short-changed of one month from the contract rate (if you signed for 7 cents for 6 months, you'll only get that for 5 months). If you don't call, your rate goes up significantly if you don't call to change to a cheaper contract. Tell them you want the cheapest rate or you will cancel with their company.
Comparing electricity plans in Houston means more than just looking at plans to find the lowest rate. Be sure to take a look at each plan's Product Details to get a better idea of what each one entails. These fact sheets are more than just supply rates per kWh and term lengths; they include information on base charges, utility fees and cancellation fees. They also can include features such as usage credits, green energy products or even free weekends.
Getting affordable electricity rates in Houston is a reality when you come to Tara Energy. We have a real commitment to offering competitive pricing thanks to our energy market expertise and corporate buying power. This way, we can offer affordable electricity rates that fit your budget. With customization flexibility, we can offer customers multiple options and custom-term contracts. Customers can benefit from more favorable contract expiration dates and industry standard long-term contracts. In order to find a solution that will meet your needs, our team of industry experts will work with you to develop an answer for energy supplies. As an established energy supplier, we can meet your long or short-term needs. Call us today at 1-866-438-8272 to solve your electrical Houston needs.
I had service with Startex at my home and at a rental property. I requested the power be turned off at the rental home. I had an online transcript of the call to document the request. Instead, they turned it off at my home. I lost all the food in the refrigerator and the freezer. The power at the rental was still on. I called them about the issue. They stated it was not their issue. They told me that the utility company must have turned it off. I called the utility provider and the confirmed they had a move our request from Startex. Startex is not ethical and does not take responsibility for their errors. Choose another provider.
Consumers in Houston, Dallas, Fort Worth and Corpus Christi were promised bargains on electricity when the Texas Legislature deregulated the electricity market. But 16 years later they're still paying more for electricity than their counterparts in cities Texas lawmakers exempted from deregulation such as Austin and San Antonio, according to the Texas Coalition for Affordable Power which analyzed federal electricity pricing data.
Where should you shop for electricity? Houstonians have the power to choose from an overwhelming variety of energy suppliers, plans, and options. If you live in the Houston metro area and your local electric utility is CenterPoint, over 50 different retail electricity providers currently offer electricity plans in your area. Each of these electricity providers offer sites, tools, and information on how to switch plans and providers. However, their information is often filled with electricity rates that are difficult to compare because of things like introductory rates, bill credits, narrow usage levels, unexpected fees, and legalese buried in the EFLs. Fortunately, Houston homes and businesses have electricity shopping options that make the process much simpler.
Comparing electricity plans in Houston means more than just looking at plans to find the lowest rate. Be sure to take a look at each plan's Product Details to get a better idea of what each one entails. These fact sheets are more than just supply rates per kWh and term lengths; they include information on base charges, utility fees and cancellation fees. They also can include features such as usage credits, green energy products or even free weekends.
As a result, power companies have shut down Texas coal plants unable to compete with lower-cost generators. Meanwhile, the low electricity prices of recent years — a function of cheap natural gas — and small profits have discouraged companies from investing in new power plants. ERCOT, which oversees about 90 percent of the state’s power grid, said power reserves that are called on when demand peaks on the hottest summer days have shrunk to the lowest levels since Texas deregulated power markets in 2002.

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Prices are expected to go up so quickly that Direct Energy has stopped selling its "Power-to-Go" plan to new customers this summer, a prepaid plan that changes rates each month depending on wholesale prices. Instead, the company is encouraging its customers to lock in for longer periods of time. Customers who used up to 2,000 kilowatts each month could get a 12-month contract for 11.7 cents per kilowatt hour in May compared to the same plan for 9.1 cents per kilowatt hour one year earlier.


With more than a decade in business as a quality electricity provider based in Houston, Spark Energy works to consistently deliver reliable, low-cost electricity, community support and a better customer experience to hundreds of thousands of satisfied customers across sixteen states. Why do we do it? Because we are committed to being the best electricity supplier in the country. In Houston, that means:
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